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Branson on bitcoin: Take that, Mr. Dimon

Sir Richard Branson says there will be a global currency—whether its bitcoin or something else—that will "take on Jamie Dimon and the other banks."

The billionaire entrepreneur spoke Friday in a CNBC interview from the World Economic Forum a day after JPMorgan CEO Dimon and Treasury Secretary Jack Lew expressed skepticism about the digital currency.

(Read more: Lew says Dimon and I share 'incredulity' on bitcoin)

"The idea is very exciting. I think having a global currency where you don't have to spend all the money changing your currencies is admirable and whoever is behind bitcoin was brilliant," the Virgin Group founder told "Squawk Box" in Davos, Switzerland. "It was a brilliant first step."

While investing in bitcoin himself, Branson said he's "not the great advocate of bitcoin."

Back in November, he announced on CNBC that his Virgin Galactic commercial space flight venture would accept bitcoin as payment. The cost in U.S. dollars to book a seat is $250,000.

(Flashback: Branson: Buy your space flight with bitcoin)

Branson told CNBC Friday, "We've had six or seven tickets already from bitcoin."

By CNBC's Matthew J. Belvedere. Follow him on Twitter @Matt_SquawkCNBC .

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