31. Nebula

Cloud command-and-control system for multiple servers

Chris Kemp, co-founder of Nebula.
David Paul Morris | Bloomberg | Getty Images
Chris Kemp, co-founder of Nebula.

Founders: Chris Kemp, Steve O'Hara
CEO: Gordon Stitt
Date launched: 2011
Funding:
$28.5 million
Industries disrupted:
Enterprise Technology, Software, Tech Hardware
Disrupting: Amazon, Google, Microsoft
Competition: Egnyte, Nutanix, Pure Storage

Enterprise cloud computing may sound like a bit of a contradiction—after all, enterprise suggests internal locked-down systems, and the cloud is, well, the opposite. But that's exactly how Nebula bills itself. The Palo Alto, California-based company was started by Chris Kemp, a former chief information officer at NASA, to give companies the same cloud-computing power as giants such as Amazon and Google.

With nearly $30 million in venture funding from a platinum list of backers—including the trio of billionaires who made the first investment in Google and Comcast Ventures—the company introduced its first product, called Nebula One. The size of a 4-inch-tall pizza box, this piece of hardware essentially enables a company to tie together dozens of their traditional servers and consolidate their power for computing, storage and networking into one machine controlled by a single person and a mouse. This is possible because the technology is based on OpenStack (open source cloud-computing technology).

Read More FULL LIST: 2014 CNBC DISRUPTOR 50

Nebula charges companies $100,000 for Nebula One, a fraction of what systems have cost to date. The company says customers include financial services companies, government agencies, such as the Palo Alto Research Center, and a large undisclosed biotech firm.

On the company's disruptive impact:

"We will deliver the Web-scale, cloud-computing infrastructure that’s been enjoyed by a small number of elite Internet companies to every business in America." -Chris Kemp, Co-founder and chief strategy officer

Technology

  • The Lenovo logo is displayed on a screen at a press conference in Hong Kong, May 21, 2015.

    Lenovo will be in a “very different” situation in terms of profit in the coming quarters as the Chinese technology giant implements a turnaround strategy, the company’s president said.

  • An Apple iPhone 6 Plus

    One pro thinks Apple should lease its iPhone in order to maintain its market share and margins, but another expert disagrees.

  • The Samsung Gear S2

    Samsung said it would make its next smartwatch technology available to its competitors who also use Google's mobile platform Android.

Latest Special Reports

  • As the world grows more interconnected, it’s harder to manage global risks. Here's some ways to mitigate the biggest challenges.

  • A globe-trotting look at the world of investing, from developed Europe and Asia trends to the least-traveled frontier markets.

  • Financial advisors stress that now is the time for investors to get serious about year-end financial planning checkup.