Kohl's, FedEx boost hiring plans for holidays

Fall might not have officially arrived yet, but companies are already detailing hiring plans for the holiday season.

Kohl's Department Stores plans to hire more than 67,000 associates this year for the crucial shopping season. The retailer also plans to hire an additional 9,300 seasonal workers at its distribution centers and about 670 seasonal credit operations positions.

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The hiring plans mark a large increase from last year's plan, when Kohl's announced it would add more than 50,000 seasonal associates in stores and an additional 6,400 seasonal distribution hires, plus 350 seasonal credit operations positions.

"Kohl's is building a winning team by hiring more than 67,000 seasonal associates across the country to ensure we sustain the great service our customers know and have come to expect," said Richard Schepp, Kohl's senior executive vice president, human resources and general counsel, in a company release. "By adding these associates, Kohl's will continue to deliver an enjoyable and convenient shopping experience to all our valued customers, whether they choose to shop in store or online at Kohls.com this holiday season."

On its earnings call, FedEx said Wednesday it expected to add more than 50,000 seasonal hires across its various business segments —the majority of which will have the opportunity to continue working for the company after the holidays end. This is a large jump from last year's plan to add 20,000 seasonal workers.

FedEx officials expect a record holiday peak season due to the rise of online sales in the U.S., the company said Wednesday.

Read MoreFedEx delivers: Earnings beat expectations

On Tuesday, fellow package delivery company UPS also detailed plans to add more seasonal workers to the payroll.

UPS expects to hire between 90,000 and 95,000 seasonal hires to help handle a surge in package deliveries timed around the holidays. Last year, the package delivery company said it would hire 55,000 workers but later added another 30,000 more, the Associated Press reported.

—By CNBC's Katie Little. Reuters contributed to this report.