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Lyft may expand to 100 cities globally in 2015

Lyft, the 2-year-old car-hailing app, is planning to expand globally next year, according to co-founder John Zimmer.

"We are in 70 markets right now," Zimmer told CNBC. "We are looking at another 100 cities in 2015 around the world."

Zimmer said the service now books 2 million rides per month, and that gross revenue is up 40 percent month over month.

The company is in a high-profile battle against rival Uber for dominance in the ride-sharing market.

With both companies, prospective riders pull out their smartphones, download the app, and summon drivers, who are professionals or everyday drivers looking to earn extra income.

Right now, Uber is in more markets and has raised more money. It banked $1.2 billion in June while Lyft has raised more than $330 million.

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The two start-ups offer similar services, but they brand themselves differently. Uber markets itself as polished and professional, while Lyft presents a fun alternative: fuzzy pink mustaches are attached to its cars.

"Today, we still have a difference in terms of what these companies stand for, and who they go after," said Thilo Koslowski, an analyst at Gartner. "Lyft has a more social emphasis, where they want you to get to know people in that service. Uber is focused on getting you [to your destination] at a premium level."

The competition between has become one of the most hostile in Silicon Valley.

On CNBC, Lyft investor Peter Thiel trashed Uber on Wednesday.

Read MoreUber is 'ethically challenged': Peter Thiel

Uber's CEO Travis Kalanick took to Twitter to call Lyft a "clone," suggesting that his rival copied his service.

Zimmer disagrees. "We launched in 2012," he told CNBC. "There was no peer-to-peer or low-cost competitor. So we innovated in this space. Everything we have done is about building the right low-cost service. So others are following us. Those are the facts."

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By CNBC's Josh Lipton