The new profile of Oracle

Technology giant Oracle hasn't topped 4 percent revenue growth in any period since 2011. "What was once considered a high-growth company has become a limited growth company, especially organically, at best," said Scott Kessler, equity analyst at S&P Capital IQ.

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A sign in front of Oracle’s headquarters is shown in Redwood Shores, Calif.
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A sign in front of Oracle’s headquarters is shown in Redwood Shores, Calif.

The company has been using acquisitions to fuel current and future growth. "It has mature businesses and offerings, overall top-line growth is limited, and it adds value by trying to invest in new areas (cloud), it is aggressively active in buying other companies, and finally it's very proactive when it comes to acquisition activity," said Kessler.

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He said Oracle has become akin to a utility company. Just like utilities such as water and electricity, it has become critical for almost all tech businesses to use technology in daily life. "Oracle provides offerings needed for day-to-day life," said Kessler.

Oracle releases its fiscal first-quarter earnings after the bell on Thursday.

—By CNBC's Christina Medici Scolaro