Narayana Murthy: India poised for growth

Narayana Murthy: India open for business
Narayana Murthy: India open for business   

N.R. Narayana Murthy, the billionaire founder of Infosys, said Thursday that he expects robust growth ahead for India.

"I think there are opportunities outside India, as well as in India," he said. "In fact, some of the largest projects that most Indian software companies are doing are in India."

On CNBC's "Fast Money," Murthy expressed faith that Narendra Modi, India's new prime minister, would lead the country toward creating a more business-friendly climate.


ounding member of Infosys, N.R. Narayana Murthy, speaks at a press conference at the company's headquarter in Bangalore.
Manjunath Kiran | AFP | Getty Images
ounding member of Infosys, N.R. Narayana Murthy, speaks at a press conference at the company's headquarter in Bangalore.

"Till now we had coalition governments," he said. "But this time we have a government which has absolute majority in the parliament. He's also a man of action. He has enunciated a program called digital India where he wants to bring the power of Internet and broadband communications to the benefit of every Indian."

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Murthy said the time was ripe for U.S.-based companies to invest in India.

"Therefore, I think this is the right time for American companies to add even more value to India," he said. "Already, we have almost every high-tech company there. We have GM. We have Ford. We have lots of American companies there, but we need even more of them because they bring a lot of value to our economy."

Murthy, who founded Infosys in 1981 with $1,150 and grew it into a market capitalization of $38.6 billion, said that he expected the company to continue its upward trajectory.

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"There is opportunity in India as well opportunity outside of India because right from Day One, we leveraged the part of globalization which is all about sourcing capital from where it is cheapest, sourcing talent from where it is best available, producing where it is most cost-effecting and selling where the markets are without being constrained by national boundaries," he said. "That's how I define globalization, and my company was based on that principle."

Murthy was named No. 13 on the CNBC First 25 List of visionary leaders who shaped the world of business and finance since 1989, the year CNBC started.