Chinese hack US weather systems, satellite network: Wash Post

This story is developing. Please check back for further updates.

Chinese hackers allegedly broke into U.S. weather systems in September, The Washington Post reported.

Federal cybersecurity forces had to seal off sensitive data on disaster planning and more in response to the hack, officials told the Post. The report indicated that officials did not acknowledge the attack until October, when the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said it was undergoing "unscheduled maintenance."

Read More US Postal Service says employee data compromised

"NOAA staff detected the attacks and incident response began immediately. Unscheduled maintenance was performed by NOAA to mitigate the attacks," the agency said in a statement to CNBC. "The unscheduled maintenance impacts were temporary and all services have been fully restored. These effects did not prevent us from delivering forecasts to the public."

In this handout provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, taken from the GOES-East satellite, Tropical Storm Arthur travels up the east coast of the United States on July 2, 2014.
NOAA | Getty Images
In this handout provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, taken from the GOES-East satellite, Tropical Storm Arthur travels up the east coast of the United States on July 2, 2014.

NOAA said the investigation is ongoing.

Although NOAA declined to comment on the source of the attack to the Post, one congressman divulged that Chinese hackers are the current suspects.

"NOAA told me it was a hack and it was China," Rep. Frank Wolf, R-Va., told the paper.

For the full report on the attack, see the Washington Post's coverage.