Intel's making waves in tech sector

Intel's making waves in the tech sector
Intel's making waves in the tech sector   

Intel's an old name in the tech sector but it's generating new headlines.

Intel chips run personal computers and servers used in data centers, and are now heading into the wearables space, with Google Glass.

The semiconductor giant has struck a deal with Google, people familiar with the situation told The Wall Street Journal. An Intel chip will be inside Google's Glass device, replacing the current processor from Texas Instruments, the people said.

Leading the drive in wearables is Mike Bell, a veteran of Palm and Apple who heads Intel's new devices group.

Visitors take pictures next to the Intel logo outside of the Intel headquarters in Santa Clara, Calif.
Getty Images
Visitors take pictures next to the Intel logo outside of the Intel headquarters in Santa Clara, Calif.

Intel also reached a deal with PasswordBox, a cross-platform identity management service that will be merged with the Intel Security Group portfolio.

Read More Intel buys password manager PasswordBox

PasswordBox allows users to log in to a number of websites and applications, by using one-tap logins, instead of retyping and remembering different passwords for each website.

By making a deal with a company such as PasswordBox, Intel turns into a software player, not just a hardware company.

PasswordBox has been downloaded 14 million times since its launch in June 2013. Terms of the deal haven't been disclosed.

This isn't Intel's first venture into personal security, it bought McAfee in 2011.

Intel is also getting its name out there through its holiday ad campaign. Jim Parsons, who plays a brilliant physicist in the hit comedy show "Big Bang Theory" can be seen blown away by Intel's products in five TV commercials.

The campaign will include dozens of companion videos and photos on social media including YouTube, Twitter and Vine.