Congress subpoenas Obamacare gaffe grandmaster Gruber

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Administrator Marilyn Tavenner (L) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology Economics professor Jonathan Gruber are sworn in before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee during a hearing about the Affordable Care Act in the Rayburn House Office building on Capitol Hill December 9, 2014 in Washington, DC.
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Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Administrator Marilyn Tavenner (L) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology Economics professor Jonathan Gruber are sworn in before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee during a hearing about the Affordable Care Act in the Rayburn House Office building on Capitol Hill December 9, 2014 in Washington, DC.

Congress isn't through kicking around Jonathan Gruber.

A congressional committee has issued a subpoena to the MIT economist Gruber demanding details of of his work with federal, state and local authorities on Obamacare, as well as how much he was paid for those jobs, The Wall Street Journal reported Friday.

Gruber testified Tuesday before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, where he apologized profusely for a series of verbal gaffes, which included having referred to the "stupidity of the American public" and a lack of transparency about Obamacare helping to get that health-care reform law passed by Congress. Gruber had been a key consultant during the creation of the law.

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"I am embarrassed, and I am sorry," said Gruber, who called his comments "mean," "offending," "uninformed," and "glib" in his testimony.

But committee chairman Rep. Darrell Issa, (R-Calif.), said in a press release Friday that Gruber "repeatedly refused to answer several key questions, including the amount of taxpayer funds he received for his work on Obamacare," according to the Journal.

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"The American people deserve not just an apology, but a full accounting, which Dr. Gruber must provide," Issa said.

Read the WSJ story here.