Why Honeywell's CEO loves low oil prices

As we head into 2015, Jim Cramer knows it's time to consult some of the best and widest reaching companies for their opinion.

That is why Cramer has gone to his long-time fave, Honeywell. This is a diversified industrial company that has its hands in the pot in everything from aerospace components, security systems, specialty materials, refining catalysts that help oil refineries suck out more gasoline from a barrel of crude and even turbochargers to boost car mileage.

Honeywell provided its forecast for 2015 on Monday morning, with in-line guidance and slightly lower than expected revenue guidance. Cramer sat down with Honeywell CEO Dave Cote to find out why he is still so optimistic about the economy these days.

"I'm not quite sure how we have gotten ourselves to a point where we think that high oil prices are a good thing for the economy. I don't quite get that one," Cote said.





David Cote, Chairman & CEO of Honeywell International.
Martin Simon | CNBC
David Cote, Chairman & CEO of Honeywell International.

Honeywell was also ahead of the game when it was one of the rare companies that haven't been burned by global exposure. Cote pinpointed all of the hot zones and planned accordingly in both Europe and Latin America. Low expectations were in their favor.

"I was never that positive on Europe to begin with. From the beginning, five years ago, I was saying that they're going to have a Japanese decade and that is the way we are going to plan for it. Zero to 1 percent growth because they're not doing the stuff that they need to. They've got the central bank that's trying to, but the governments are not," the CEO said.

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Cote also pointed out that when it comes to the aviation industry and energy efficiency, the decisions taking effect today were made back when oil was priced at $50 and $60 a barrel.

"It's just funny how convoluted and upside down we can get things sometimes. I've been viewing this as oil prices are coming down, more money in the consumer's pockets around the world... this is a good phenomenon," Cote added.

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