Advice for De Blasio: Build back the relationship

NYPD turns backs on de Blassio: What's a Mayor to do
NYPD turns backs on de Blassio: What's a Mayor to do   

How do you manage a workforce that is no longer on your side?

That is a question facing New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio as tensions continue to escalate with the city's police force. Last week some members of the police turned their backs at the mayor during the funerals of two slain officers Wenjian Liu and Rafael Ramos. It was a silent protest over what the police say is a lack of support by the mayor for the city's police officers.

Former Continental Airlines CEO Gordon Bethune and former Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell have both dealt with unhappy unions in the past. They told CNBC's "Power Lunch" that the mayor must show real personal interest in the police and make efforts to show that he cares about them.

"I'd go ride around with them in the police cars at night, visit the stations and let them know firsthand that he's interested. That's what he needs to do," Bethune advised.

Some with backs turned, New York City police attend a funeral service for slain officer Wenjian Liu, January 4, 2015 in New York City.
Shannon Stapleton | Reuters
Some with backs turned, New York City police attend a funeral service for slain officer Wenjian Liu, January 4, 2015 in New York City.

Rendell said that the mayor should maintain his good relationship with Police Commissioner William Bratton and use that as a way to rebuild rapport with the police. He added that the mayor should "keep his mouth shut and let things die down."

"I think the mayor was right when he said that [the funeral] wasn't the place for it, and it wasn't the place for it," said Rendell. "But that's not for the mayor to say. The mayor has got to let this die down and slowly, quietly, and without publicity do things to build back the relationship."

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