Time to get clear on oil

Cramer: Let me be clear about oil
Cramer: Let me be clear about oil   

This might sound like an oversimplification, but Jim Cramer saw a lot of asymmetrical selling back in January, especially when it came to the wacky nature of oil.

Could this pattern permeate February as well, or will there be a new positive foundation to work from going forward?

One would think the asymmetrical disease has been cured considering that Monday closed with a nice rally. However, to fully understand what will happen going forward, Cramer thinks investors need to look back at what occurred for January.

"When the news is bad, the sellers are much more powerful than the buyers, and when the news is good the buyers just aren't paying up anymore," said the "Mad Money" host.

Read More Cramer: January's broken market days finally gone?

Chevron
David Paul Morris | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Oil was on the rise again on Monday, and the big question is, will it make a U- or V-shaped rally?

"I have to tell you I think the U camp makes more sense,even as we saw another dramatic spike in the price of crude today," said Cramer.

Every time oil spikes, Cramer hears speculation that there is a beginning of a V-shaped rally for oil. But Cramer noticed something else that wasn't talked about in the news.

Last week Chevron froze its buyback, and Exxon Mobil cut its buyback in half on Monday. If oil were really done going down, they wouldn't have done this. There would have been an increase instead.

"I see these spikes as a chance to lighten up. I'm with Chevron and Exxon. If they're freezing or cutting their buybacks, I want to wait to see what happens."

That doesn't mean that oil prices go back up, either. Cramer thinks it will come back but will take its time getting there.

If there is one thing that Cramer learned from watching the Super Bowl, it is that 2015 is the year of the connected car.

Cramer sees that these car infotainment systems have gone from luxury accessories to near necessities this year. He is willing to bet that in five to 10 years from now every new car will have one.

This explains how a stock such as Harman International rallied 26 percent last week, amid an ugly market. Harman is the leading provider of automobile infotainment systems.

"I still think the stock is worth buying at these levels, although obviously I'd like it even more if gets taken down by the next inevitable marketwide pullback," said the "Mad Money" host.

So, keep this one in your back pocket for the next down day, because Cramer thinks Harman is at the epicenter of the biggest tech theme of the year. It's not just involved with connectivity to cars, it is connectivity.

Read More Cramer: The best tech for 2015 - it's headed higher

Mina De La O | Stone | Getty Images

To get an expert opinion on whether the dark days of the averages could be behind us, Cramer turned to Dan Fitzpatrick, a technician who is president and founder of StockMarketMentor.com.

Since November, the S&P has been displaying a rare diamond pattern. Just as a real diamond, this pattern is very rare—but it is far from valuable.

When this occurs, it means that the ceiling of resistance and floor of support are no longer at extreme levels. Fitzpatrick is worried that the S&P 500 could be in the final phase of the pattern. That is when there is too much resistance for it to break out into the upside, so it ends up breaking down instead.

"In short, Fitzpatrick views this diamond as a sign that the S&P may have peaked and could be ready for a dramatic decline," said the "Mad Money" host.

Read More Cramer: Rare diamond pattern means ugly days ahead

One stock that has displayed resilience, even in the face of a diamond-shaped stock market was DexCom. This is a medical device company behind the most popular glucose monitoring system for individuals with Type 1 diabetes.

Cramer first highlighted this as a speculation stock back in March 2011, and it has rallied 352 percent since that time. What makes DexCom different from the rest is that the old days of requiring people to prick their finger to test blood sugar are gone.

It created a sensor that sticks to skin for a week and blood sugar data is transmitted to a wireless receiver, allowing the individual to share the results with their caregiver and other individuals.

To find out how this company could have achieved such tremendous results, Cramer spoke with DexCom CEO Terrance Gregg.

"The FDA worked with us in a very collaborative way in order to achieve this. They recognized the need for this, and so they worked with the company in order to achieve this in record time," said Gregg.

In the Lightning Round, Cramer gave his take on a few caller favorites:

Atlas Energy LP: "There are so many high quality stocks that are down so much, I'm going to tell you not to go into this one."

Packaging Corp of America: "I like packaging, but I like International Paper better, and I like the new guy. He's not bad."

Read MoreLightning Round: They can't screw this one up