Early movers: NFLX, GMCR, SIX, DE, YUM & more

Trader on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.
Brendan McDermid | Reuters
Trader on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

Take a look at some of Friday's early movers:

Netflix—The stock jumped more than 3 percent to above $600 a share after Chinese media executives at BesTV New Media and Wasu Media Holding told the Wall Street Journal they have held early talks with Netflix. No decisions were made.

Keurig Green Mountain—CLSA reduced its fiscal year 2016 estimates and price target to $103 from $108 after the coffee-machine maker's Kold system demonstration gave higher-than-anticipated suggested pricing. CLSA maintains an "underperform" rating on the stock and projects lower household penetration. Shares plunged more than 6.5 percent in pre-market trade.

Google—The tech conglomerate said in a blog post that it would send self-driving cars to public roads this summer.

UPS—Goldman Sachs upgraded the stock to "buy" from "neutral" and raised its price target to $119, citing a positive skew in the risk/reward proposition and stronger-than-expected pricing in ground delivery services. Goldman also raised its view on logistics firms to "attractive" from "neutral."

Six Flags—Wedbush initiated coverage of the amusement park operator at "outperform" and a price target of $58, for an upside of about 20 percent. Six Flags "continues to grow at a rate unmatched by its competitors" both domestically and internationally, the research note said.

Yum Brands—JPMorgan upgraded the stock to "overweight" from "neutral," noting greater potential for spinning off China operations.

Deere & Co.—JPMorgan downgraded the stock to "underweight" from "neutral," citing high levels of used inventory and possible pressure on liquidity for farmers in 2016. The target price was cut to $84 from $90. Shares fell 1.8 percent in pre-market trade.

Sovran Self Storage—UBS upgraded the firm to "buy" from "neutral" and raised its price target to $100 from $96, citing operation upside and rational supply.

Honda—The automaker is recalling nearly 5 million vehicles with potentially faulty Takata airbags, Reuters said. The number of inflator recalls worldwide since 2008 is now about 36 million.

SAB Miller—The global brewer is buying British firm Meantime to expand into the growing craft beer trend in the United Kingdom and Europe, Reuters said.

Facebook—The social media network came under fire in Europe as Belgian watchdog Privacy Protection Commission said it tramples on European privacy laws by tracking individuals online without their consent, while avoiding national regulators' questions, Reuters reported.