Christie faults media bias for 'Bridgegate' heat

New Jersey governor and possible GOP presidential candidate Chris Christie said Thursday he's been victimized by a liberal media bias over the closure of lanes on the George Washington Bridge, otherwise known as "Bridgegate."

In a wide-ranging interview on CNBC's "Squawk Box," in which he also discussed the 2016 race, the economy, and national defense, Christie compared his treatment to that of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, and the flap over her using a private email server to conduct official business.

Shortly after Christie won a second term as governor in 2013, coverage of his administration was dominated by the lane closures on the George Washington Bridge—allegedly engineered by aides as political retaliation for the Fort Lee mayor's refusal to endorse Christie's reelection bid.

Although Christie has not been directly implicated, he told CNBC the ensuing days of scrutiny have been much more relentless than recent news accounts of the Democratic presidential candidate's use of a private server.

Read MoreGov Christie: Wealth gap in US worse under Obama

"Has there been coverage of the email situation with the secretary, absolutely. But the intensity of the coverage, and the relentlessness of the coverage is different. And that's where the bias is revealed," Christie said.

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The governor also said there was a "rush to judgment" in the reporting about whether he may have played a role in the political retribution scheme, which has resulted in the indictment of 2 former aides. Christie has steadfastly maintained his innocence.

"Fifteen months later ... everything that I said the day after that story broke, everything I said, has proven out to be true after three different investigations," he said.

Earlier this month, federal authorities charged three one-time Christie allies in the scandal.

The governor's former deputy chief of staff, Bridget Kelly, and ex-Port Authority official Bill Baroni face a trial in November for allegedly conspiring to close lanes on the New Jersey side of the bridge into Manhattan to punish the mayor of Fort Lee, New Jersey for not supporting Christie's reelection bid. Both have denied the charges.

David Wildstein—who had been Baroni's top aide at the Port Authority—has pleaded guilty, and he's expected to be a key witness for the prosecution.

Wildstein claimed the lane closures were carefully calculated, covered up with a fake traffic study, and started to coincide with the first day of school in September 2013 to maximize pain to commuters.

The Port Authority of New York & New Jersey conceives, builds, operates, and maintains the bridges, tunnels, airports, and transit infrastructure critical to the region.

—Reuters contributed to this report.