Twitter would be 'instant fit' for Google: Chris Sacca

Sacca's tweaks for Twitter
Sacca's tweaks for Twitter   

Twitter would be an "instant fit" for Google, should the Internet search giant acquire the company, early Twitter investor Chris Sacca said Wednesday.

"I think it's a fantastic use of Google's cash," the founder of Lowercase Capital said in an interview with CNBC's "Closing Bell."

"This is the thing that Google has never had. They've never understood social, they've never understood those personal interactions. This bolts right in cleanly."

Chris Sacca
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Chris Sacca

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Sacca isn't necessarily advocating Twitter would be better off being acquired. In fact, if Twitter makes changes to increase and engage users, he thinks it would be "much better" as an independent company.

He outlined those changes in a note earlier Wednesday titled, "What Twitter Can Be."

His suggestions include a creation of channels organized by topics and making live events easier to monitor and participate in by creating a separate tab within Twitter.

He also suggested a save button for articles and offers users see in their news feed and read receipts so users could know if a celebrity saw their follow or retweet.

"Twitter just needs to go out and court the next few hundred users. Existing changes to the incremental product aren't going to do it," Sacco said.

"But there are people out there looking for an easier way to see tweets, an easier way to participate in the network, and they want to feel like they're there engaged, having fun, they're appreciated there."

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However, if Twitter decides not to make changes, then he thinks a name like Google, Microsoft or Facebook should make a bid for the company.

Whether Twitter makes those changes through acquisitions or organically within the company doesn't matter, he said, as long as they are executed.

As for CEO Dick Costolo, Sacca wasn't calling for his resignation and thinks questions over his reign will be quashed if he does the right thing.

"If they execute on the kinds of ideas that I put out there … then nobody will be asking those questions about Dick in the months ahead," he said. "If this is not the stuff they're working on and they can't get this stuff done, then I think the board is going to act in the interest of shareholders."

Sacca also stressed that he wasn't threatening to sell his stake in Twitter.

"I'm not out there selling shares. There's no punitive result if Twitter doesn't do this kind of stuff," he said.

"This is a very, very long-term hold, and I know his company is going to be massively more valuable than it is today."