The biggest economic-turnaround story: Minnesota

When I became governor in January 2011, Minnesota's unemployment rate stood at 6.8 percent. Our state government faced a projected $6.2 billion deficit for the next two years. Additionally, we owed our school districts more than $2 billion in delayed state aid.

Since then, Minnesota's economic turnaround has been extraordinary.

Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton
Source: Office of the Governor
Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton
"For years, business recruiters have said that it's sometimes difficult to attract people to Minnesota, but it's almost impossible to get them to leave."

Our state's businesses have added nearly 190,000 new jobs. Our unemployment rate has dropped to 3.7 percent. We have completely repaid our school and other debts, and we now enjoy a $2 billion projected budget surplus for the next biennium.

Read MoreAmerica's Top States for Business 2015

The credit for this successful recovery belongs to the people of Minnesota.

To the small-business owners and large corporate executives who have reinvested in our state. To their hardworking, productive employees, who have made those investments successful.

Minnesota is now teeming with growing businesses, offering more goods and services and employing more people to provide them.

Top States #1: Minnesota
Top States #1: Minnesota   

Minnesota's economic success and social progress have always come from our citizens. We're used to achieving our successes through our own ingenuity, ability and old-fashioned hard work.

Read MoreUS governors make case for why their state is best for biz

Education is a key Minnesota value. We have built excellent public and private education systems. Our students have achieved the nation's highest ACT scores for the past nine years. Our schools, colleges and universities underpin our better workforce, higher-quality public services, healthier citizenry and superior quality of life.

For years, business recruiters have said that it's sometimes difficult to attract people to Minnesota, but it's almost impossible to get them to leave. Come find out why.

By Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton