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Don't panic over NYSE trading being halted

Don't panic over the NYSE halt, consider it a great time to take an ice cream break.

The immediate reports are that this is not a cyber attack and that it is a technical glitch. We have experienced several of these technical outages over the years and they really are nothing to worry about.

A screen above the floor of the New York Stock Exchange shows when there was a halt in trading in New York, July 8, 2015.
Lucas Jackson | Reuters
A screen above the floor of the New York Stock Exchange shows when there was a halt in trading in New York, July 8, 2015.

For our money-management clients at Brian Kelly Capital, we trade in over 100 different markets in up to 70+ exchanges so an outage in one of those exchanges has little impact on our investments. More importantly a technical outage has absolutely no bearing on our investment decisions.

Read MoreWhy is it taking so long for the NYSE to reopen?

The conspiracy theorists will have a field day with the timing of the outage just as the equity markets were picking up downward momentum - but reality is technical outages can and do happen. The most important thing for investors to do right now is to cancel all outstanding orders (as of this writing I believe the NYSE is already taking that action). Nonetheless, check your account for any outstanding orders that you may have forgotten about and may need re-enter.

The mantra to remember today is twist on an old saying, at times like these "don't just do something, stand there!" We intend to exactly that ... well, after we get an ice cream.

Read MoreCashin: Here's what to do after halt ends

Brian Kelly is founder and managing member of Brian Kelly Capital LLC, a global macro investment firm catering to high net worth individuals, family offices and institutions. He is also the creator of the BKCM Indexes, benchmarks for multi-asset money managers. He's also the author of the upcoming book, "The Bitcoin Big Bang: How Alternative Currencies Are About to Change the World." Kelly, a CNBC contributor, often appears on "Fast Money." Follow him on Twitter @BKBrianKelly.