Greece doesn't tell Europe's story: JPM's Erdoes

The Greek debt crisis masks "a lot of fantastic things" taking place in the European economy, said Mary Callahan Erdoes, CEO of J.P. Morgan Asset Management on Wednesday.

"There's a lot of opportunity there," she said at the Delivering Alpha conference presented by CNBC and Institutional Investor.

Quantitative easing supports "tremendous growth" in the European economy, and earnings and consumer confidence, among other metrics, have picked up recently, she noted. Greece's ongoing debt crisis has become "a humanitarian issue" European leaders need to resolve.

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Mary Callahan Erdoes at Delivering Alpha in New York.
David A. Grogan | CNBC
Mary Callahan Erdoes at Delivering Alpha in New York.

Europe now needs to worry about "adjacencies" to other areas of conflict including Ukraine and Russia, added Richard Perry, CEO of Perry Capital. Leaders had to consider the implications of Greece leaving the euro zone, he noted.

Market watchers at Delivering Alpha also touched on the volatile Chinese stock markets, which have put a scare into global investors, during a panel Wednesday. H-shares, or Chinese incorporated stocks listed in Hong Kong and elsewhere, are currently "much more interesting" than A-shares listed in mainland China, said Eric Mindich, CEO and founder of Eton Park Capital Management.

Panelists also noted that Chinese markets do not necessarily reflect underlying fundamentals of that nation's economy.

"There's a lot going on in the economy and it's completely disassociated with the stock market," Erdoes said.

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Though China has drawn more headlines recently, Japan presents more opportunities for investors looking to buy into Asia, Mindich added.

"The world is dramatically underweight Japan," he said.

Large multinational companies based in Japan will struggle amid a stronger dollar in relation to the yen, Erdoes noted. She contended the "real opportunities" exist in Japanese companies that have grown domestically and can focus on exporting with a weaker currency.

Christopher Ailman, chief investment officer of the California State Teachers' Retirement System, noted the portfolio is mostly weighted in U.S. investments. Looking forward, he has considered investment in developed Asian economies and "China becomes a big part of that."

However, Ailman noted that he faces a challenge in China when considering environmental, social and governance factors for investing.