Cramer Remix: How to conquer stock rotations

Jim Cramer has seen no stronger fury than one of a hedge-fund manager caught with the wrong position. That happened Thursday, when portfolio managers realized they didn't have enough cyclical exposure prompted some dramatic action.

"You want a perfect example of what the heck I'm talking about? Let's talk Alcoa," the "Mad Money" host said.

The stock of the aluminum giant has been in the doghouse for ages. It roared more than 10 percent on Thursday, even though nothing happened to justify the action.

Cramer reminded investors to keep in mind that this is a market with limited participation. That means in order to buy these cyclical stocks, managers will need to sell other stocks. They are now selling the retailers and drug stocks.

"I say be careful. These rotational moves are only for the most nimble, meaning for those who truly believe that they can outrun the bears," Cramer said.

Cramer explains the sudden flock to commodities

Alcoa
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Cramer was shocked by the action on Clorox on Thursday. The company reported a solid earnings beat and raised full-year guidance for 2016, yet the stock was slammed hard, down almost 5 percent in a single session.

What the heck just happened to Clorox?

Cramer spoke with Clorox CEO Benno Dorer to find out if the company behind such well-known brands as Glad Bags, Kingsford charcoal, Hidden Valley salad dressing and Burt's Bees could be offering a terrific entry point.

"I focus on the long-term fundamentals. Our shareholder return has been very solid over the last 12 months, our stock grows more than 20 percent, and fundamentally, what I care about is, are we delivering against the business?" Dorer said.

Read MoreCramer: What the heck just happened to Clorox?

The market has been brutal lately for high-flying growth stocks, especially the cybersecurity plays.

Cramer considers Palo Alto Networks to be best-of-breed in the group, and the stock roared 40 percent last year. However, after peaking in December Palo Alto has dropped nearly 24 percent in less than two months.

Could the drop be a reflection of worries about cybersecurity? To find out, Cramer spoke with Mark McLaughlin, the chairman and CEO of Palo Alto.

"I think the hacks actually continue. The data we have that they are on the rise. They may not be as widely publicized or the big brands names, but they are definitely happening," McLaughlin said.


Benno Dorer, Clorox CEO
Mary Catherine Wellons | CNBC
Benno Dorer, Clorox CEO

While "Mad Money" is in San Francisco in anticipation of theSuper Bowl, Cramer decided to speak with some actual football players.

Rob Gronkowski is tight end for the Patriots, and revealedthat he hasn't touched a dime of his NFL earnings. Instead, he lives off ofjust his endorsement deals and personal business ventures.

When Cramer asked him how one strives to create a nation, suchas the well-known "Gronk Nation," Gronkowski replied "You've got to be a Gronk."

On Thursday, Yum Brands reported for the first time since it announced plans to spin off its massive Chinese business. And while Cramer found the results somewhat mixed, he did start to see some signs of life from the company.

Cramer spoke with Greg Creed, CEO of Yum Brands, to find out more about the quarter and where the company could be headed.

"I think what we have created is two powerful, independent, focused growth companies. On the one hand, Yum Brands will be a global franchisor of three iconic brands," Creed said. "And then, with Yum China, we will obviously have access to the fastest growing economy in the world."

Yum CEO teases Taco Bell's new secret menu item

In the Lightning Round, Cramer gave his take on a few caller favorite stocks:

Apollo Education: "It deserves the pounding because we're not going there. We do not care about these kinds of stocks. They've been disasters for a while."

Las Vegas Sands: "I do prefer MGM, which I think represents a cheaper call. Not as much Macau, and its CEO Jim Murren is determined to bring out value."

Read MoreLightning Round: CEO determined to bring out value

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