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Trump picks Rudy Giuliani to meet with companies about cybersecurity

Former New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani arrives at Trump Tower, November 22, 2016 in New York City.
Getty Images
Former New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani arrives at Trump Tower, November 22, 2016 in New York City.

President-elect Donald Trump's administration will hold private industry meetings on cybersecurity preparedness, led by Rudy Giuliani, the transition team and Giuliani announced today, although important details on which companies may be involved are still unclear.

"The president-elect decided that he wanted to bring in, on a regular basis, the people in the private sector, the corporate leaders in particular, and thoughts leaders in the private sector, who are working on security for cyber, because we're so far behind," Giuliani said on Fox & Friends as he announced the initiative.

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Giuliani, who runs a security consulting firm, said on the show he would be in charge of coordinating the group. In a statement released today, the transition team said "it is contemplated" that the president-elect's team will hold meetings with "companies which have faced or are facing challenges similar to those facing the government and public entities today," including hacking and other security threats.

The details on when the group may meet also haven't been sketched out. The transition team announced only that the "attendees may or may not change from session to session," although the group's agenda would. While Giuliani's TV announcement seemed to say the group would be made up of security companies, the transition team announcement suggested it could include companies that have themselves been targets.

"The President-elect's intent is to obtain experiential and anecdotal information from each executive on challenges faced by his/her company, how the company met the challenges, approaches which were productive or successful, and those which were not," according to the statement.

Trump, meanwhile, continues to face questions about hacking from Russia meant to interfere with the US election. After being criticized for not accepting the US intelligence community's view that Russia interfered with the election to damage Hillary Clinton's campaign, this week, after receiving an intelligence briefing on the matter, he seemed to come around, saying, "Russia, China, other countries, outside groups and people" are involved in hacking in the US.