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Trump takes a Twitter victory lap, taunts Democrats for losing special elections

  • President Donald Trump takes a victory lap after Republicans win special congressional elections in Georgia and South Carolina.
  • He says in tweets that Democrats would be better off working with the GOP on his agenda.

President Donald Trump taunted Democrats on Twitter just after Republicans won two closely watched special congressional elections.

After the GOP's Karen Handel and Ralph Norman won their respective races in Georgia and South Carolina on Tuesday night, the president congratulated them in separate tweets. He then hit Democrats for their winless stretch in special elections this year to replace Trump nominees who vacated solidly red seats.

He said that Democrats got nothing for "all the money spent." Jon Ossoff — the Democratic candidate in Georgia — spent at least $22 million on the race while outside Republican groups funneled cash into the election, leading to the most expensive House race ever.

The president lauded what he called a 5-0 record in congressional races since his election. While the GOP won four special elections in Kansas, Montana, South Carolina and Georgia, the fifth special election in California featured two Democrats, so it is unclear exactly what Trump means.

He followed it up with a Wednesday morning tweet contending that Democrats "would do much better as a party" if they worked with Republicans on Trump's agenda.

Republicans may see holding the seats as one sign that Trump's agenda and lack of popularity may not be as damaging for the party as Democrats hope. Democrats have aimed to leverage Trump's dismal approval rating and opposition to the Republican health-care bill into winning Republican seats and potentially taking control of the House in 2018.

In the four races for red House districts vacated by Trump nominees, the Republican candidate won but the Democrat performed better than the party's House candidate did in 2016.

Still, it is not clear yet what the effect will be on the 2018 elections, which take place more than a year from now. Democrats need to win 24 seats to take control of the House.

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