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Corporate Finance Accounting

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    U.S. federal regulators will announce a settlement on Friday with former Fannie Mae  executives over their alleged roles in a 2004 multibillion-dollar accounting scandal, a person familiar with the settlement said on Thursday.

  • Former Enron CEO Jeff Skilling (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

    Attorneys for former Enron CEO Jeffrey Skilling will argue Wednesday that his 2006 conviction should be overturned because of “shocking” and “egregious” misconduct by prosecutors.

  • The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission charged Canada's Biovail, two current senior executives and former Chief Executive Eugene Melnyk with engaging in a number of fraudulent accounting schemes, the agency said on Monday.

  • Attorneys for jailed former Enron CEO Jeffrey Skilling say the government illegally withheld key evidence that would have proven he is innocent.

  • A federal grand jury and the Securities and Exchange Commission have been investigating the anti-money laundering practices of Fidelity Investments, according to a report in the Boston Business Journal.

  • Warren Buffett's just-released annual letter to shareholders features a blistering attack on what he calls the "fanciful figures" of Corporate America's accounting, especially when it comes to assumptions about pension fund returns.  He says those assumptions are far too optimistic, designed to boost short-term earnings at the expense of future retirees.

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    American International Group shares fell 7 percent on Friday, a day after the world's largest insurer reported a $5.29 billion quarterly loss.

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    President Bush urged Congress on Friday to quickly pass an economic stimulus package void of extraneous spending, saying only quick action will kickstart the sputtering economy. "I strongly believe it would be a mistake to delay or derail this bill," Bush said.

  • The Supreme Court upheld a ruling that investors cannot sue third parties such as banks and accounts in cases of securities fraud.

  • The office of New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo on Thursday said it launched a formal investigation into Intel to determine whether the world's biggest chipmaker violated state and U.S. antitrust laws to squeeze out its rival, Applied Micro Devices.

  • Attorneys for the brothers of hedge fund manager Seth Tobias say his wife killed him because "Seth was worth substantially more to (her) dead than he was alive, and she knew that."

  • The U.S. Attorney's Office in Brooklyn has broadened its investigation into the collapse of two hedge funds that Bear Stearns managed, CNBC has learned.

  • Lawyers who won a class action suit against Tyco International and PricewaterhouseCoopers will be awarded 14.5 percent of the $3.2 billion settlement, plus nearly $29 million in expenses, a judge has ordered.

  • Conrad Black leaves a federal courthouse in Chicago on Januart 12, 2007.

    A judge sentenced former media mogul Conrad Black to 6-1/2 years in prison for obstructing justice and defrauding shareholders of one-time newspaper publishing giant Hollinger International.

  • VeriFone Holdings on Monday said it will restate some financial statements due to errors in accounting related to inventory, which affect the company's reported costs of revenue.

  • A federal judge has named two New York pension funds lead plaintiffs for five class-action lawsuits accusing Countrywide Financial, the largest US mortgage lender, of inflating earnings and overstating its ability to weather the housing slump.

  • Japan Tobacco, instant noodle maker Nissin Food Products and frozen food maker Katokichi announced Thursday a deal under which Japan Tobacco and Nissin will purchase the frozen food producer.

  • A New York appeals court has upheld the convictions of former Tyco International  senior executives Dennis Kozlowski and Mark Swartz, the court clerk's office said Thursday.

  • Leap Wireless International said Friday it will restate results from 2004 to the second quarter of this year, after making errors in reporting revenue and operating expenses, pushing its shares down more than 31 percent.

  • Two former officers at a company that supplies body armor to the U.S. Army face charges they inflated the company's stock price and made nearly $200 million in the process.