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Business Africa

  • Map of Africa

    Contrary to popular opinion, the best investment bet that you can make in 2011 is in Africa. You wouldn’t know it if you turn on a TV or read a newspaper, since U.S. and European media focus relentlessly on areas of unrest and instability, but the reports beyond the front page tell a very different story.

  • Rare Opportunities

    CNBC's Brian Shactman talks to industry insiders to find out the next great rare earth investments.

  • Harvested cocoa beans

    International shipping companies have resumed deliveries of cocoa from the world’s largest supplier but analysts say the commodity will remain volatile for the foreseeable future.

  • Recent events in the Middle east and northern Africa have show that the supply and price of food can lead to major social unrest and even the downfall of a government. Many in the developed world take food for granted, but in most developing nations it can be a daily struggle and a life-and-death issue. The global recession of 2008-09 took some the wind out of surging agricultural prices, but there's growing concern that globalization will ultimately tax food supplies. Population and income grow

    Many in the developed world take food for granted, but in most developing nations it can be a daily struggle and a life-and-death issue. Click to see which countries are most vulnerable to food shock.

  • Somali Pirates

    The International Maritime Bureau reported last week that global piracy hit an all-time high in the first quarter of 2011, driven by a rise in attacks off the coast of Somalia.

  • And here's how market pros recommend cashing in on the rising inflation trade.

  • An anti-government protestor holds a blooded Egyptian flag in Tahrir Square on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt.

    In Egypt's government ministries, factories and especially universities, daily protests have focused on those viewed as Mr. Mubarak’s surrogates, the New York Times reports.

  • A rebel militiaman stands guard at a Libyan oil refinery in rebel-held territory on February 27, 2011 in Al Brega, Libya. The opposition leadership has stressed that oil faciities in areas under its control are safe, despite the conflict roiling the country.

    Libyan rebels are set for their first oil export as soon as Tuesday as they seek funding to sustain their uprising against Muammer Gaddafi's 41-year rule of the north African nation, the Financial Times reports.

  • John Pameri, head of the security at the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy in central Kenya, holds a Rhino tusk his team took from a Rhino that was shot dead by poachers earlier in the week, at the security headquarters on December 9, 2010. Spanning 62,000 acres, Lewa is home to more than 10 percent of Kenya’s black rhino population and over 14 percent of Kenya’s white rhino population.

    Ounce for ounce, rhino horns sell for more than gold — one reason why conservationists say Africa's rhinos are facing their worst poaching crisis in decades.

  • A Libyan jet bomber crashes after being shot down in Benghazi on March 19, 2011 as Libya's rebel stronghold came under attack, with at least two air strikes and sustained shelling of the city's south sending thick smoke into the sky.

    As anti-aircraft fire rang out across Tripoli for the third night in a row and US airstrikes yet to slow, one analyst told CNBC that there is a very real chance of Libya being divided between the Gaddafi-controlled West and rebel-controlled East.

  • An RAF Tornado GR4 aircraft is prepared for launch, the first UK air combat mission in support of UN Resolution 1973, at RAF Marham on March 19, 2011 in Norfolk, England.

    Analysts are warning that the decision of the BRIC nations not to support the no-fly zone in Libya is an indication that in years to come Gaddafi-like dictators will find it easier to wage war on their people without external intervention.

  • With civil unrest spreading from the Middle East to other countries around the world with the help of social networking, it seems that no authoritarian ruler is safe. With this in mind, the question is who's next? The sudden disintegration of the multi-decade rule of leaders like Hosni Mubarak suggests that other long-standing dictators could go.Although Venezuela's Hugo Chavez and North Korea's Kim Jong Il draw the world's attention, the list of rulers considered to be dictators is a long one.A

    So, which dictators have been in power the longest and how have their economies fared under their rule? Find out!

  • Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton says Muammar Gaddafi has left the world no choice but to threaten military action against him.

  • Cramer has advice for investors who want to sell stocks now.

  • Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi

    From Liberia to South Africa to the island of Madagascar, Libya’s holdings are like a giant venture capital fund, geared to make friends and wi n influence in the poorest region in the world.  The NYT reports.

  • Libyan rebel fighters stand ready with anti-aircraft weapons at a checkpoint on the outskirts of Ras Lanuf on March 6, 2011 which in spite of air strikes by the regime, the key oil pipeline hub was still in rebel hands, AFP correspondents reported, countering claims by a state-owned television that it had been recaptured. AFP PHOTO / MARCO LONGARI (Photo credit should read MARCO LONGARI/AFP/Getty Images)

    The leader of Libya’s rebellion has warned countries that have failed to support the uprising against Muammer Gaddafi that they would be denied access to Libya’s vast oil riches if the regime is deposed, the Financial Times reports.

  • Muammer Gaddafi

    The Libyan leader Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi has “tens of billions” in cash secretly hidden away in Tripoli, allowing him to prolong his fight against rebel forces.

  • Libyan opposition supporters demonstrate in Benghazi, Libya.

    Many in Europe worry that they will face new waves of illegal immigration not only from the liberated areas in the north, but from much of sub-Saharan Africa as well, the New York Times reports.

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  • Somali Pirates

    On Tuesday, Somali pirates shot and killed four American hostages. A single hostage intentionally killed by these pirates had been almost unheard of; four dead was unprecedented. The New York Times reports.