Food and Beverage Agriculture

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  • Farmer picking weeds

    Gillian Tett of the Financial Times says markets may be headed for another "summer curse" and she points to five reasons why.

  • Harvested cocoa beans

    Cocoa — the main ingredient for Kit Kats, Hershey’s bars and Snickers — may rally into the second-half of this year as low rainfall and drier weather forecast for Ivory Coast, the world’s leading cocoa supplier, threaten to reduce yields and deplete global stockpiles.

  • Jim Rogers

    "If oil does go to $40, that means it'll just be setting up an even more bullish scenario for the duration of the bull market," the famous investor says.

  • The Business of Wicked Weather

    CNBC's Rick Santelli discusses the impact heat is having on U.S. corn crop; and Weather Channel's Paul Walsh discusses how the heat wave is impacting consumers.

  • vegetables_in_garden.jpg

    In sum, to ensure a world where hunger does not overwhelm society, bold leadership will be necessary to preserve civility in the global neighborhood.

  • Sun shines on seed corn plants in a field in Tiskilwa, Illinois. Corn supplies in the U.S., the world’s biggest exporter, are declining at the fastest pace since 1996 just as a Midwest heat wave damages the world’s largest harvest for a third consecutive year.

    Farmers have planted the most corn since 1937, but record-setting heat is threatening the crop yield, causing futures prices to jump.

  • field-of-marijuana-plants2-200.jpg

    Hemp is one of the most versatile crops in the world. For food products, only the hemp seed is used. The rest of the plant — the stalk or fiber, can be used for clothing, building materials or energy.

  • corn_field_dry_200.jpg

    Corn is facing the worst crop conditions in two decades, pushing up prices that could affect everything from cereal to the ethanol in gasoline.

  • Gartman: Corn Crop & Climate

    "If we do not see rain by probably July 4, the corn crop will be diminished dramatically," says Dennis Gartman of The Gartman Letter.

  • CNBC Investigations Inc.

    CNBC Investigations Inc. found that none of the proposals to expand crop insurance would add anything to combat fraud, which costs taxpayers as much as hundreds of millions of dollars a year.

  • Federal Crop Insurance Fraud Costs Millions

    In East Tennessee, a "natural disaster" is staged to get federal crop insurance. Another farmer in California claims desert scrub land as a wheat field. As the crop insurance program expands, fraud is likely to increase. With CNBC's Scott Cohn.

  • Costa del Sol region in Spain.

    1st paragraph of story should go here

  • When it comes to playing it safe with commodities, you'll want a portfolio  with winners to offset the inevitable losers.

  • factory-worker2-200.jpg

    U.S. regulators, retailers and manufacturers are growing increasingly concerned that a surge in the number of products being recalled is resulting in "fatigue" by the public — increasing the chance that consumers could ignore or miss a recall that could ultimately endanger their health, USA Today reports.

  • Pig over Paris

    People often think of it as being as American as apple pie, but many cultures around the world bring home the bacon.

  • An urban beekeeper inspects part of her colony of Italian honeybees on the roof of her Brooklyn building. Beekeeping is a growing phenomenon among environmentally-conscious urban dwellers in cities nationwide, and practioners cite the health benefits of natural honey as well as the boon to gardening that bees provide by pollination.

    An iconic hotel in the heart of midtown Manhattan is buzzing with thousands of tiny new visitors. But watch out: They'll sting if you get too close.

  • Gartman: 'Go to the Sidelines'

    Dennis Gartman, The Gartman Letter, explains why investors should return to the sidelines and forecasts where gold is headed.

  • livestock_farmer_200.jpg

    While the number of dairy cows in the U.S. hasn't changed much, the number of dairy farms has been dropping as small farms either go out of business or consolidate to become more competitive and cost effective.

  • Check out his conversation with CEO James Hagedorn.

  • US Agriculture Secretary on Food Safety

    Concerns about mad cow disease and "pink slime" are raising recent questions about food safety. Tom Vilsack, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, offers insight.