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Food and Beverage Agriculture

  • As millions of procrastinating Americans prepare to file their taxes, here's a fun fact: William Shakespeare was a tax dodger!

  • Corn Prices Collapsing

    Corn futures are down to 9-month lows today; farmers plan to plant on 97 million acres this year. Virginia McGathey, McGathey Commodities president, discusses the impact this will have on the commodity.

  • Karlie the cow was sold for $170,000.

    Think beef is expensive now? A cow just sold for a record $170,000 at auction in Syracuse, New York.

  • U.S. corn and soybean futures plunged on Thursday, on track for their biggest daily loss in months, after a government crop report shocked professional traders.

  • A fence separates the cities of Nogales, Arizona (L) and Nogales, Sonora Mexico.

    A new study from the Sunlight Foundation reveals who is dominating the $1.5 billion lobbying efforts in Washington, D.C. over immigration reform. You might be surprised by the results.

  • Rice fields in Texas.

    They got a little rain in Southeast Texas this week, but hardly enough to provide relief for rice farmers who are grappling with a third year of drought conditions and water constraints.

  • Beef & Dairy Blues

    The rising cost of feed is pushing beef prices higher, reports CNBC's Jane Wells.

  • New Growth Corn Field Rows

    Nerves are on edge across the heartland, especially after the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Thursday that it expects little relief from the drought over the next three months.

  • Milk: Got Sequester?

    Milk is a huge deal in Washington. The milk industry carries a lot of weight. But now dairy farmers are utterly concerned about the relationship and you should be concerned about the impact, reports CNBC's Jane Wells.

  • The New Mexico company, Valley Meat, drew complaints over a two-year period from federal inspectors and state regulators over its disposal of remains when it processed cattle for beef. The New York Times reports.

  • Why on earth is the Department of Agriculture keeping the names of which companies are in danger of defaulting on government loans a secret?

  • Improved weather is projected to result in a successful growing year, which could reduce the pressure on grain, livestock feed and consumer prices.

  • Here's a hint: It's not because of increased immigration enforcement or border violence.

  • Noble: Positive on 2013 Agricultural Outlook

    Yusuf Alireza, CEO at Noble Group, tells CNBC why the commodities trading firm remains upbeat for 2013, despite posting a 14 percent fall in fourth quarter profit on losses at its agriculture business.

  • Sequester's Impact on Food Safety

    House Agriculture subcommittee chairman, Rep. Michael Conaway (R-TX), talks to CNBC about what's likely to happen to food safety if the sequester causes a mass layoff of USDA inspectors.

  • FILE - In this June 28, 2011 file photo, bottles of Roundup herbicide, a product of Monsanto, are displayed on a store shelf, in St. Louis. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)

    The case, over a farmer who reproduced and saved seeds patented by Monsanto, questions whether natural replication can constitute patent infringement. The NYT reports.

  • Farmland values in the U.S. Plains states jumped more than 20 percent in the fourth quarter from a year earlier.

  • A researcher sorts leaf samples from a soybean plant at a Monsanto facility.

    The United States Supreme Court will decide that in a case involving a 75-year-old farmer from Indiana named Vernon Bowman. Monsanto sued Bowman in 2007, claiming the farmer has for years used seeds reaped from a first crop of Monsanto Roundup Ready soybean seeds to grow another crop.

  • Pro trader Jim Iuorio explains why he thinks the price of corn could continue to fall.

  • The Tortoise Rally

    Taking a closer look at the broader market, with Mark Travis, Intrepid Capital Funds and Peter Sorrentino, Huntington Asset Advisors.