Food and Beverage Agriculture

  • The New Mexico company, Valley Meat, drew complaints over a two-year period from federal inspectors and state regulators over its disposal of remains when it processed cattle for beef. The New York Times reports.

  • Why on earth is the Department of Agriculture keeping the names of which companies are in danger of defaulting on government loans a secret?

  • Improved weather is projected to result in a successful growing year, which could reduce the pressure on grain, livestock feed and consumer prices.

  • Here's a hint: It's not because of increased immigration enforcement or border violence.

  • Noble: Positive on 2013 Agricultural Outlook

    Yusuf Alireza, CEO at Noble Group, tells CNBC why the commodities trading firm remains upbeat for 2013, despite posting a 14 percent fall in fourth quarter profit on losses at its agriculture business.

  • Sequester's Impact on Food Safety

    House Agriculture subcommittee chairman, Rep. Michael Conaway (R-TX), talks to CNBC about what's likely to happen to food safety if the sequester causes a mass layoff of USDA inspectors.

  • FILE - In this June 28, 2011 file photo, bottles of Roundup herbicide, a product of Monsanto, are displayed on a store shelf, in St. Louis. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)

    The case, over a farmer who reproduced and saved seeds patented by Monsanto, questions whether natural replication can constitute patent infringement. The NYT reports.

  • Farmland values in the U.S. Plains states jumped more than 20 percent in the fourth quarter from a year earlier.

  • A researcher sorts leaf samples from a soybean plant at a Monsanto facility.

    The United States Supreme Court will decide that in a case involving a 75-year-old farmer from Indiana named Vernon Bowman. Monsanto sued Bowman in 2007, claiming the farmer has for years used seeds reaped from a first crop of Monsanto Roundup Ready soybean seeds to grow another crop.

  • Pro trader Jim Iuorio explains why he thinks the price of corn could continue to fall.

  • The Tortoise Rally

    Taking a closer look at the broader market, with Mark Travis, Intrepid Capital Funds and Peter Sorrentino, Huntington Asset Advisors.

  • John Deere Hybrid Tractor

    Deere, the world's largest farm equipment maker, reported first-quarter results above analysts' expectations as farmers geared up to plant the biggest corn crop in U.S. history.

  • Agriculture Outlook: Corn, Soybeans & More

    Despite the historic drought of 2012, more corn is expected, reports CNBC's Jane Wells. It is still the lowest amount in well over a decade.

  • The Agriculture Department expects the U.S. to end up with more corn than expected, though the country will still have the tightest supplies in well over a decade.

  • A sharp rise in the cost of onions – a vegetable of volatile price that is credited with toppling two Indian governments since 1980 – has sent jitters through the Congress-led coalition government of Manmohan Singh, the prime minister. FT reports.

  • Chicken wing prices have spiked, making this year's Super Bowl parties more expensive than last year. Maybe it's time to serve bacon instead of wings!

  • The Rock on 'Got Milk'

    Per capita milk consumption has fallen 23 percent since 1975. Does milk need a super hero? Enter Dwayne Johnson, aka "The Rock," America's new milkman.

  • Mike Wilson, president and chief executive officer of Agrium Inc

    Agrium CEO Mike Wilson told CNBC Tuesday that criticism from activist hedge fund Jana Partners, which has called for a breakup of the Canadian fertilizer company, "has no legs."

  • Light snow expected next week in crop growing areas of the United States will provide only minor relief from the worst drought in more than 50 years, an agricultural meteorologist said Friday.

  • Despite the warnings that last summer's historic drought would drive up the cost of food, prices rose only 2.6 percent in 2012. But food inflation is expected to rise above the historical average in 2013.