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Business Alan Greenspan

  • Wall Street sign

    Wall Street’s focus this week turns to second-quarter earnings announcements, and I can tell you that my contacts on the Street are worried.

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    Today and tomorrow, Maria Bartiromo will host CNBC’s Closing Bell live from Aspen Ideas Festival. Over the last 50 years, this gathering has become the place for global leaders to come and gather at the one of the world's most beautiful spots to discuss the most innovative ideas and the most pressing issues.

  • Alan Greenspan

    Former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan said the recent stock market decline is “typical” of a recovery, and that international instability has more to do with the selloff than problems in the US.

  • When Ben Bernanke testified a couple of days ago before the House Budget Committee, he gave a fairly upbeat forecast of 3.5 percent growth this year, and somewhat stronger growth in 2011. Okay, fine.

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    As the House and Senate begin merging their separate bills into a single bill, they still have a chance to make some important improvements. Here are four issues to watch in coming  weeks. The NYT explains.

  • Before we blame Greenspan for the past bubble and bust, it is worth reiterating that of course there was a lot of blame to go around in this area.

  • The Federal Reserve headquarters in Washington, DC.

    Ask almost anybody in the money business, including the bulk of the investor class, and they will tell you that budget deficits drive up interest rates. I’m here to tell you that is wrong. It may seem reasonable, but it’s still wrong.

  • Social Security Check

    The system is projected to pay out more in benefits this year than it receives in taxes, a tipping point toward insolvency that was not expected before 2016.

  • Alan Greenspan

    In his most detailed examination of the causes of the financial crisis, Alan Greenspan, the former Federal Reserve chairman, acknowledges that the Fed failed to grasp the magnitude of the housing bubble but argued that its policy of low interest rates from 2002 to 2005 did not cause the bubble.

  • I was a bit surprised to read an excerpt from former Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson's new book, that depicted Lockhart as "nervous" in those crucial few days leading up to the takeover of Fannie and Freddie and very reluctant to put the two into conservatorship. Paulson called the FHFA a "weak regulator," and seemed to imply the same of Lockhart.

  • Tonight, we learn about Mr. Paulson's thinking behind all those decisions, taken in response to the financial crisis, and, ultimately, in the pursuit of long-run American prosperity.

  • This Monday, Henry Paulson will be on CNBC as Larry's guest. The former head of the Treasury is coming on CNBC to talk with Larry about his new book and his role in the bailouts and AIG.

  • US Federal Reserve Board Chairman Ben S. Bernanke

    Why did Mr. Greenspan and Mr. Bernanke miss the housing bubble? The New York Times explains.

  • Alan Greenspan

    Former Fed Chief Alan Greenspan predicts that the unemployment rate will push past 10 percent and stay at that level for a while.

  • On the last day of Sept. 2008, one of the wildest, scariest months in U.S. financial history, the Wall Street-Washington roller-coaster starts climbing again.

  • Monday starts out hopeful. By day's end, those hopes are dashed, as the House kills the bailout bill and stock markets plunge to new lows.

  • This Day 1 Year Ago - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    Sunrise: Congressional leaders from both parties emerge from intense talks to present a $700 billion financial rescue plan agreement on Sunday.

  • This Day 1 Year Ago - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    As events go, Saturday seems more sedate than it has in weeks. But it's a false calm, as Washington scrambles to find common ground on a financial rescue plan.

  • This Day 1 Year Ago - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    White House, legislators fail to teach agreement on the $700 billion financial bailout. U.S. shuts WaMu and JPMorgan grabs the assets.

  • What's Next?

    The crisis the world went through is just an appetizer for a future one because the weaknesses that created it have not been addressed, Marc Faber, author and publisher of the Gloom, Doom and Boom Report, told CNBC Friday.