Alternative Investing Memorabilia

  • aaron_b_signed_ball.jpg

    The market is not only vast, it is also dynamic and sometimes unpredictable. Diamonds may be forever, but the same can't be said of cultural icons.

  • Madonna performs onstage during the opening night of her 'Sticky and Sweet' tour at the O2 Arena on in London, England.

    Michael Jackson’s jacket, a Madonna dress, even plates bearing the Queen of England’s face - in a world of cold hard investment, the collection of special items that hold a particular value because of their significance in our collective memory makes a welcome change, and  perhaps represents the ultimate alternative investment.

  • With more than 15 million U.S. golfers, the market for collectibles has expanded greatly in recent years. Such memorabilia can make good investments that increase in value over time. Experts suggest buying pieces attached to golf’s biggest names, especially those who figure prominently in the sport’s history. Autographed golf clubs, balls, shoes and gloves fall into this category, as do signed tournament pin flags, action photos or award medallions.“When you consider acquiring golf collectibles

    With more than 15 million U.S. golfers, the market for collectibles has expanded greatly in recent years. Such memorabilia can make good investments that increase in value over time.

  • Dewey defeats Truman authentic newspaper

    While campaign and presidential mementos may be only a hobby for some, they also represent a real investment for many political junkies and even for those not drawn by political sentiment.

  • Interested in a long-term investment ? Look no further than history — collecting political memorabilia is a profitable pastime for many. As with most collections — prices can range from just a few dollars for paper items such as postcards to thousands of dollars for antique presidential objects. "With the instability of the stock market people want to put money in value, something that will appreciate in value," says Megan Miller of Juliens Auctions in Beverly Hills. Political memorabilia , espe

    Check out some items that are currently available  in the political and presidential memorabilia market and their values.

  • They're from out of this world.But space related memorabilia comes up for auction pretty frequently, say experts. One auction house, RR Auction, is auctioning off hundreds of beginning January 12, 2011. So what are space collectors after? Items from or associated with Apollo 11, the 1969 mission that first brought man on the moon, are always more valuable than others, says Larry McGlynn, an avid collector who helped  value the auction items. Anything that has been on the moon’s surface is sure t

    RR Auction is auctioning off hundreds of space memorabilia online beginning January 12, 2011. Check out some of the highlights from the auction.

  • There is always a market for items owned or used by big-name celebrities. When that celebrity is an icon—think Michael Jackson, Marilyn Monroe, John Lennon—the value of the item grows exponentially. A jacket worn by Lennon, for example, is expected to fetch $150,000-$200,000 at a Beverly Hills, Calif.  Dec. 3-5. , the company holding the auction, is selling a number of items from some of the biggest celebrity names. Click on see some highlights.

    At a Beverly Hills auction Dec. 3-5 held by Julien’s Auctions, items from the biggest celebrity names sold over their estimated value. Click for highlights!

  • Apple 1

    Christie's has auctioned off an Apple I from 1976, the first product from the company.  It sold for $230,000.

  • 1964 Aston Martin DB5, estimated at over $5.5 million.

    It’s arguably the most famous car in the world and it’s coming out of the showroom and onto the market for the first time ever.

  • When it comes to investing in sports memorabilia, buying pieces attached to a big name is usually the way to go. Take a look at some sports collectibles from icons ranging from Joe DiMaggio to Muhammad Ali to Michael Jordan.

    When it comes to investing in sports memorabilia, buying pieces that are attached to a big name is usually the way to go. Learn why.

  • John Lennon

    A Beatles historian has come across one of the last autographs John Lennon signed before his fatal encounter with Mark David Chapman thirty years ago. CNBC has learned that rock historian Denny Somach will put the autograph up for sale next week.

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    The recession may have relegated some of America’s most revered financial institutions to the scrap heap of history, but it also upped the ante on vintage stock certificates, coffee mugs and ballpoint pens from corporate icons that hearken back to yesteryear.

  • Celebrity auctions have made big news so far in 2009, most notably  which was ultimately canceled. , which has orchestrated numerous celebrity auctions - for names like Cher, U2, Bob Hope, Elton John and Ozzy Osbourne - is planning a particularly interesting event in this year’s annual summer sale.The 2009 auction, which will be held June 26-27 at Planet Hollywood Resort in Las Vegas, features over 700 celebrity items, including approximately 150 items from the life of Marilyn Monroe and unique

    Here are some highlights from Julien’s Auctions' 2009 auction at Planet Hollywood Resort in Las Vegas, featuring over 700 celebrity items.

  • Used to serve beer to bar patrons, this tray shows the brewery buildings of the Anheuser-Busch Brewery in St. Louis. Originating in the 1890s, decorated trays were popular through 1917. This tray is sometimes referred to as the “Factory Scene Tray.” Collectors value this item at $1,200 to $1,500.

    Used to serve beer to bar patrons, this tray shows the brewery buildings of the Anheuser-Busch Brewery in St. Louis. Collectors value this item at $1,200 to $1,500. Learn more.

  • Sports Memorabilia: Top Collector Hits a Homer

    Marshall Fogel, one of Americaâ??s top collectors of sports memorabilia, gives the public a glimpse of his prized possessions, including rare items from Babe Ruth, Mickey Mantle, and Ty Cobb. CNBCâ??s Darren Rovell says their value is more than just sentimental.

  • John Lennon

    On Wednesday morning a small pop-culture memorabilia shop in Midtown opened an 836-lot auction timed to what would have been Lennon’s 70th birthday, which is Saturday. The prized item was a set of Lennon’s fingerprints made in 1976 as part of his application for citizenship. Minimum bid: $100,000.