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  • What Warren Buffett once called "financial weapons of mass destruction" are firing again, with securitization and shadow banking at post-crisis highs.

  • This is an NBC news story.

  • Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

    A humbled Sony — once a titan of Japan Inc. — recently sprang back into the black for the first year in five years, courtesy of a plunging yen. Honda, another corporate icon, triumphantly announced a return to Formula One racing, rejoining an exclusive club of high-performance car makers after having slinked away when cash ran low, the NYT reports.

  • Goldman Sachs has upgraded its target for the S&P 500, forecasting it will climb a further 5 percent to 1750 by year-end, from an initial estimate of 1625.

  • Tumblr

    As investors and analysts size up Yahoo's latest $1.1 billion acquisition, it is worth reflecting on the GeoCities deal, which has many similarities, the NYT reports.

  • Australia's dollar has received its fair share of whacking lately and perhaps it's time to give the currency a bit of a break, currency strategists say.

  • British luxury group Burberry posted a 14 percent rise in full-year pretax profit and said profit for the first half of its new fiscal year would be below last year's as it reduces its wholesale business in favor of retail markets.

  • Former Italian First Minister and Member of the Italian senate of the new Italian Government Mario Monti.

    Former Prime Minister Mario Monti said he did not believe an election will be called any time soon.

  • Some of Asia's most successful entrepreneurs confess to their most common mistakes.

  • The big divergence over the past few months in the direction of the S&P 500 and copper, which historically trade in tandem, has one strategist questioning which market is getting it wrong.

  • Reports that China may step up the diversification of its huge foreign exchange reserves is not great news for U.S. Treasurys, already under pressure from talk about an easing in the Fed's bond-buying program.

  • Australia's central bank felt it needed to cut interest rates at its May meeting because the economy was still growing at a below-potential pace and inflation was not a threat, minutes showed on Tuesday.

  • Nearly every rich country has gone through a "T-shirt phase" — an economic period in which poor farmers work in textile and apparel factories. Bangladesh is at the beginning of the race. The New York Times reports.

  • The silver chart shows that those who are wishing for a rise in the gold price will be disappointed. The silver downtrend will continue and gold will follow.

  • President Barack Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping will hold their first meeting since Xi became president in March when they sit down for a June 7-8 summit in California.

  • U.S. dollars on display at the NYSE.

    The stock market and the U.S. dollar have started to move in lock step again, which analysts say could be a positive for U.S.-centric companies.

  • This is an NBC news story.

  • Bitcoins

    With news that authorities seized assets of the world's largest bitcoin exchange, traders and other people interested in the digital currency are looking nervously at the future.

  • As Western economies come to terms with low growth and an inability to afford their social commitments, nationalist and isolationist movements will come to the forefront, HSBC's Stephen King told CNBC.

  • Richard Fisher

    Whatever course it chooses, the Fed will have to grapple with the reality that while its policies have helped stocks, they've been less effective at growing the economy.

Charting Asia with Daryl Guppy