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Asia-Pacific News Australia & New Zealand

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    Asian markets came under pressure on Tuesday after U.S. stocks pulled in a mixed performance.  Investors sold financials following weak earnings from Bank of America.

  • Australia's Sigma Pharmaceuticals and grocery wholesaler Metcash are in talks over a joint bid for assets being sold by Primary Health Care, both companies said on Tuesday.

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    Asian stocks rose to their highest level in seven weeks on Monday, as investors cheered upbeat earnings from U.S. bellwethers which triggered a rally in U.S. stocks last Friday.

  • Australia's producer prices surged by a record 1.9 percent last quarter, far above forecasts and sparking concerns the country's inflation problems will not be tamed as quickly as many had hoped.

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    Australian conglomerate Wesfarmers, facing increased debt refinancing costs for its $17 billion acquisition of retailer Coles, said it would sell new shares to raise $2.33 billion.

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    Asian markets eked out some gains Friday. Stocks spent the better part of the session dipping below and above the line. Japan and South Korea pulled ahead at the close, finishing higher, but China and Australia closed weaker.

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    Asian stock indexes made firm gains Thursday, with the exception of the Shanghai Composite Index, boosted by financial and technology stocks with Japan, South Korea and Australia all closing stronger.

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    Asian markets moved forward Wednesday, with high-tech exporters buoyed by a reassuring outlook from industry leader Intel and energy shares underpinned by record high oil prices. Japan and Australia both closed over 1 percent higher

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    Asian markets wavered between losses and gains Tuesday, but closed broadly higher, as oil and gold prices gained. The U.S. dollar struggled to attract buyers due to signs of a weak earnings season for banks, which could expose yet more subprime losses and punish stocks worldwide.

  • Stock investors watch stock movement at a stock exchange in Chengdu, China.

    Asian markets dropped sharply Monday as a nasty earnings surprise from General Electric and a 26-year low in U.S. consumer sentiment drowned out the Group of Seven nation's support for the U.S. dollar.  Japan shed 3% while China was down over 5%.

  • A man uses his mobile phone in front of electronic stock boards at the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX Ltd.) headquarters in Sydney, Australia.

    Asian stocks rose Friday, with Japan's Nikkei closing almost 3 percent higher, led by chipmakers on expectations a slump in the sector may soon end, while oil prices retreated after testing a record high above $112 a barrel.

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    Asian markets closed mixed Thursday while the U.S. dollar remained weak on concerns about the impact of a credit crisis on the global economy and as record oil prices fuel inflation worries.

  • Asian markets took a turn into negative territory while the U.S. dollar stayed weak Wednesday as worries resurfaced about the economy and a global financial crisis.  Japan closed 1.1% lower.

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    Most Asian markets sagged Tuesday, led by financials as news of a possible capital injection at Washington Mutual failed to eliminate concerns about more bank writedowns.

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    Asian markets rose Monday, with resource companies benefiting from stronger metals and oil prices, while the dollar rose, shrugging off worse-than-expected U.S. job losses. But concerns about the impact of the credit crisis on the financial system lingered, driving banking shares lower. Japan closed over 1 percent higher.

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    Australia's trade deficit blew out to a record in February as bad weather and supply bottlenecks dented exports of coal and iron ore, while solid business spending at home kept imports near all-time highs.

  • Australia plans to restrict sales of laser pointers after they were used to blind pilots preparing to land in several unresolved incidents, an official said Sunday.

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    Asian markets closed near one-month highs Friday, with investors trading cautiously ahead of U.S. jobs report that is expected to raise fresh concerns that the economy is closer to a recession. Japan finished lower, but South Korea and Australia closed almost unchanged.

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    Australia's top central banker said on Friday there were signs that domestic demand was cooling in a way that would help restrain inflation, suggesting he thought interest rates had risen enough for now.

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    Asian stocks rose to their highest in a month Thursday as a rally in gold and oil lifted resource shares. Japan and Australia both finished over 1% higher.