×

Asia-Pacific News Australia & New Zealand

  • tse2.jpg

    Asian markets rallied on Wednesday as investors took a shine to the U.S. Federal Reserve's interest rate cut. Australia had a spectacular session, finishing 4% higher. Japan and South Korea both ended over 2% higher.

  • tse.jpg

    Asian stocks closed mostly higher Tuesday after Monday's selloff as battered financials regained some luster ahead of a Federal Reserve meeting that is expected to yield steep U.S. rate cuts. Japan finished 1.5 percent higher, but Australia closed flat.

  • RBA.jpg

    Australia's central bank was still concerned that interest rates might not be high enough to restrain inflation when it hiked rates to a 12-year high earlier this month, minutes of the policy meeting showed on Tuesday.

  • Stock investors watch stock movement at a stock exchange in Chengdu, China.

    Asian markets plunged Monday, but stocks were off session lows. Japan closed 3.7 percent lower and Hong Kong fell 5 percent.

  • Investors study shares prices during the morning trading at RHB private stock market gallery in Kuala Lumpur, Friday, Feb.3, 2006. Malaysia's key stock index rose Friday to a 15-week high as foreign funds plowed into key bluechips after a long holiday. The Composite Index of 100 blue chip stocks ended at 927.85 points, up 13.84 points or 1.5 percent from last Friday's close. (AP Photo) **MALAYSIA OUT**

    Asian stocks ended mixed Friday as investors were uncertain about whether the worst was indeed over for credit markets. Japan shed 1.5 percent but Australia managed to hang on to gains closing 1.4 percent higher.

  • tse2.jpg

    Asian markets sank Thursday with investors spooked by news that Netherlands-listed fund Carlyle Capital, expects its lenders to seize its assets and cause its likely liquidation. Carlyle Capital is an affiliate of private equity firm Carlyle Group.

  • oz_BlkA.jpg

    Australian employment growth blew past all expectations in February while the jobless rate hit fresh 33-year lows, reviving speculation that the drum-tight labor market might yet spark another rise in interest rates.

  • tse.jpg

    Asian stocks closed firmly higher Wednesday, though off their earlier highs, after the U.S. Federal Reserve, in a joint effort with other central banks, said it would add up to $200 billion in funds to help resuscitate strained credit markets.

  • oz_BlkA.jpg

    Australia's trade deficit ballooned 41 percent in January as strong domestic demand sucked in imports while bad weather and supply bottlenecks crimped export growth. 

  • oz_BlkA.jpg

    Asian markets moved out of negative territory and closed higher Tuesday. Japan and South Korea both ended over 1 percent higher despite initial sharp losses during the morning.

  • Investors study shares prices during the morning trading at RHB private stock market gallery in Kuala Lumpur, Friday, Feb.3, 2006. Malaysia's key stock index rose Friday to a 15-week high as foreign funds plowed into key bluechips after a long holiday. The Composite Index of 100 blue chip stocks ended at 927.85 points, up 13.84 points or 1.5 percent from last Friday's close. (AP Photo) **MALAYSIA OUT**

    Asian stocks slumped to a seven-week low Monday, following a fall in U.S. stocks last Friday, after data showed employment fell in February at its fastest rate in five years, heightening worries about the economy.

  • chevron_logo_new.jpg

    U.S. oil major Chevron plans to develop two multi-billion dollar gas projects in Asia, amid forecasts of surging gas demand and rising prices.

  • Stock investors watch stock movement at a stock exchange in Chengdu, China.

    Asian markets performed dismally Friday as fears of more credit-related losses hit financial shares and a record low U.S. dollar routed exporters. Japan, Australia and Hong Kong all closed over 3 percent lower. 

  • tse1.jpg

    Asian markets rallied Thursday, with Japan and South Korea both finishing over 1 percent higher after more positive economic data out of the U.S. eased investor concerns over a global recession.

  • oz_BlkA.jpg

    Australia's trade deficit ballooned 41 percent in January as strong domestic demand sucked in imports while bad weather and supply bottlenecks crimped export growth. 

  • Dollar and Yen

    The foreign exchange maneuver known as the carry trade looks set to continue unwinding, with bearish investors scared of risks. But buying opportunities might emerge from the trend, analysts told CNBC on Wednesday.

  • Singapore Skyline.jpg

    Asian stocks had a shaky performance Wednesday with markets drifting back and forth for most of the session, but ending mainly lower as credit worries and fears over the health of the U.S. economy lingered.

  • oz_BlkA.jpg

    Australia's economy expanded at its slowest pace in a year last quarter but only because strength in consumer and government spending was tempered by a big drag from the country's trade deficit.

  • A man uses his mobile phone in front of electronic stock boards at the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX Ltd.) headquarters in Sydney, Australia.

    Asian markets closed mostly lower Tuesday, having drifted in and out of negative territory during volatile trading. Japan closed flat, but Chinese stocks ended 2.3 percent in the red. Gold and platinum hovered at or near record highs.

  • RBA.jpg

    Australia's central bank on Tuesday raised interest rates to a 12-year peak of 7.25 percent as it fought to keep inflation under control, but noted tentative signs the red-hot economy might be cooling.