Autos Automobiles and Components

  • 2007 Toyota Corolla

    Toyota Motor is considering halting exports from Japan of the Corolla sedan from around 2013 and shifting that output overseas due to the strength of the yen, Kyodo news reported on Thursday.

  • Recession-themed newsprint cuttings

    All signs point toward a long-term struggle for most states, as they continue to beat back the effects of the recession.  2011 will bring new challenges, as federal stimulus funds run dry, tax revenues decline, and jobless rates remain high.

  • Six in 60

    Here's why you should keep a close eye on these six stocks.

  • street_signs_what_if_140.jpg

    Is there an easier solution to fixing the economy? Should we look at cutting military benefits? Taxing religious property? Selling national park land? Share your opinion.

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    Phil Bredesen says those states that have become dependent on federal funding are going to be in trouble in January when stimulus money dries up.

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    Like a car gaining fast in the rear view mirror, Hyundai is quickly picking up ground on the world's leading auto makers. If you need further proof of it, check out what the South Korean company earned in the third quarter: $1.2 Billion.

  • 1964 Aston Martin DB5, estimated at over $5.5 million.

    Arguably the most famous car in the world has sold to an American car enthusiast for £2.6 million ($4.1 million) after being put on the market for the first time ever.

  • Nissan Leaf

    A new study this morning by J.D. Power confirms what many in the auto industry have been predicting for some time: The electric car revolution is likely to be more of a slow change.

  • 1964 Aston Martin DB5, estimated at over $5.5 million.

    It’s arguably the most famous car in the world and it’s coming out of the showroom and onto the market for the first time ever.

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    Now that Ford Motor Company is operating profitably and growing, it is looking to accelerate the repayment of its debt and improve its balance sheet, CEO Alan Mulally told CNBC on Tuesday.

  • Ford

    The carmaker's third-quarter net income rose 68 percent as it grabbed a bigger share of the US auto market and buyers paid more for its highly-rated cars and trucks.

  • Ford

    It ain't sexy. It ain't the kind of news the average person will get excited about. But make no mistake, the news from Ford on Tuesday is exactly what you want to see out of the automaker.

  • Cramer’s predicting a boost in earnings estimates across the board for 2011.

  • Plus, get calls on the banks, chemicals and more.

  • How about a bull market in aftermarket auto parts. Cramer talks with the CEO.

  • Toyota

    The truth is, what the cars and trucks we drive (all brands) are better made and perform better. The problem is the current news cycle and the way the auto industry is structured.

  • The new 2011 Ford Explorer SUV touts a sleek newly designed look that the company hopes will attract new buyers to the venerable SUV line.

    This is proof that even in a down economy, if you've got a hot product it will sell. In this case it's Ford raking in greater profit per vehicle thanks to a line-up that is spot on with buyers and the company's vision when it comes to in-car technology.

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    The rise in gun sales and food stamp demand are indicators of a fearful public that’s struggling financially, Nicholas Colas, chief market strategist, ConvergEx Group, told CNBC Monday.

  • 2010 Toyota Prius

    While the press debates the merits of the new Chevy Volt and the upcoming release of Nissan's electric LEAF, the most interesting "green" car story may be about the king of the segment, the Toyota Prius. It has not received as much attention, but Toyota's plans to extend the Prius line shows Japanese auto maker will be vigorous in making sure it continues to lead the industry in alternative fuel vehicles.

  • Gold coins and bar

    Financial advisors have long recommended that investors have some precious metals in their portfolios, but years of solid gains, as well as heightened interest in inflation hedges and safe havens, have made metals more alluring than ever.