Autos Automobiles and Components

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    Consumers with less than stellar credit are getting car loans again as lenders loosen their standards, and the trend is likely to continue as more lenders get into the business.

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    Are sanctions a good way to stop a country from doing something? Share your opinion.

  • Companies that produce goods that are in demand in China could see further strong growth ahead, Robin Griffiths, technical strategist at Cazenove Capital, told CNBC Monday.

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    As we work our way through the last month of the year, there's an intriguing story playing out with Hyundai and Chrysler.

  • So many automobiles roll through the backgrounds of movies and on TV shows, only to meet a humble end of getting compacted into a cube at a junkyard. But other cars are the movies and the TV shows in which they appear, or else they make such a memorable impression that they carry on the movie’s legacy as they are sold or displayed in museums. Most slides of the following famous cars were provided by Bob Hartwig, the director of rental operations at in North Hollywood, CA, which creates and suppl

    Many automobiles roll through the backgrounds of movies and on TV shows, but only a select few carry on the movie’s legacy as they are sold or displayed in museums. Check out our list!

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    The auto industry is re-making itself. It is leaner, more efficient and smaller. And in that transition there is a need for engineers and those with technical knowledge to build more fuel efficient vehicles.

  • Ford will notch record profits, electric cars will be a niche product and Chrysler will re-assert itself.

  • Manufacturing goods

    Netflix slips and gets bought out, the glow comes off of General Motors stock and investors shun Chinese IPOs.

  • Car Keys

    All major automakers but Toyota reported strong U.S. sales increases in November as the auto industry's slow-motion recovery continued to gain traction.  Ford, General Motors, Chrysler, Nissan, Hyundai and Honda all reported double-digit increases.

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    The November auto sales rate looks like it will top 12 million for a second straight month. That along, with encouraging comments and news from GM and Ford make it clear the auto industry recovery is kicking into gear.

  • Chevy Volt

    General Motors said Tuesday it will hire 1,000 additional engineers and researchers in the Detroit area as it moves toward the next generation of electric vehicle technology.

  • Today, Chevy begins production of its much-anticipated (mostly) electric Volt. Also today, Kelley Blue Book has released a study saying only seven percent of drivers would consider buying an electric car.

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    Shipments of RVs, an economic indicator, for 2011 are expected to be up 8.2 percent from those this year. Currently, about 8.3 million households now own an RV.

  • In this handout image provided by General Motors, The first pre-production Chevrolet Volt is on the assembly line at the Detroit-Hamtramck manufacturing plant in Detroit, Michigan.

    Today, GM begins production of its all new Chevy Volt at its Hamtramck plant in Detroit. As Job #1 events go, this is one of the most highly anticipated we've seen in years.

  • See what's happening, who's talking and what will be making headlines on Tuesday's Squawk on the Street.

  • The comment from BMW CEO Norbert Reithofer is an intriguing one. Speaking at a conference in Europe, Reithofer said that Germany's auto makers, "Have to come up with something new."

  • In the very least, it's the best turnaround story in a generation.

  • Ford

    Today, the company announced the results of a convertible debt offering it extended in October. Seventy-five percent of the Ford note holders (totaling $2.56 Billion) accepted the offer to convert their Ford debt into Ford common shares.

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    On Wednesday, the Consumer Product Safety Commission is scheduled to vote to create a new, publicly accessible database of safety complaints that is intended to make it easier for consumers to learn about problems with a product, the New York Times reports.

  • I saw the latest poll showing a growing number of Americans now feel the auto bailouts were a good idea that have, for the most part, paid off.