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Autos Automobiles and Components

  • Ford Explorer

    Ford's Explorer brand is getting a second life in 2011 as a more fuel-efficient crossover.

  • frogs.jpg

    Greek officials said a horde of frogs forced the closure of a key northern highway for two hours Wednesday.

  • mercury_car_gone_200.jpg

    CNBC has learned Ford executives are working on a plan to phase out the Mercury brand. There is no time line for how quickly the brand will be eliminated, but the Ford Board of Directors could make a decision by July. A Ford spokesperson says Ford has made no plans to change the Mercury line but the company is always evaluating its brands.

  • daimler_byd_logo.jpg

    China's BYD and Germany's Daimler are creating a 50-50 "research and technology" joint venture to "develop" electric cars in China.   Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway owns a 10 percent stake in BYD and Buffett has personally promoted the company.

  • green_car_200.jpg

    Today in Washington, a group of lawmakers will roll out their plan to get the Department of Energy to spend billions of dollars nurturing the electric vehicle market.

  • Nissan Leaf

    Today in Smyrna, Tennessee, Nissan CEO Carlos Ghosn will be on hand for the start of production for the battery packs that will power the Leaf.

  • car_dealership_ford.jpg

    Ask Ford President of the Americas Mark Fields if he expects strong sales in the month of May, and you get an interesting response. Yes, he expects double-digit industry growth and Ford should have a relatively strong month, but his interest has already shifted to June.

  • Ford

    It's not every day one of the Big 3 decides to take work it contracted to a foreign supplier and bring it in house back in Detroit.

  • As Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne unveiled the new Jeep Grand Cherokee he flashed a smile that said just how far the troubled automaker has come in the last year.

  • Tesla Model S

    At first glance, it looks like a win/win situation. The partnership of Tesla and Toyota should, on paper, help both companies.

  • 1928 Isotta

    Quick. What’s more fun to invest in than bullions of gold or a fistful of stocks?  Classic cars, of course.

  • Toyota

    Once again, Toyota executives are on Capitol Hill getting grilled about unintended acceleration. Once again, the hearing will end without an understanding of what's behind complaints of Toyota's racing suddenly speeding up. Once again, I can hear supporters and critics saying these hearings are a joke. Both are right.

  • 2010 Toyota Prius

    They want to move forward. But making sure they don't repeat past mistakes keeps reminding them (and the public) of where they've been. It's the yin and yang of where Toyota executives find themselves this spring and summer.

  • Hint: Not US banks. Plus, who should GM pay back first?

  • Auto sales transaction

    The financial reforms being debated in the Senate have prompted resistance from a variety of businesses, but perhaps nowhere more intensely than in the already beleaguered auto industry, where dealers find themselves pitted against Mr. Obama in their aggressive campaign to exempt themselves from the new rules.

  • General Motors Headquarters

    With a first quarter profit of nearly $900 million dollars ($1.66 per share), GM not only showed it is back in the black, but more importantly, laid another brick in the foundation needed for an IPO.

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    Ford CEO Alan Mulally said Thursday that the automaker should be "solidly" profitable in 2010 as it recovers from a sharp downturn in the auto industry.

  • This year, Ford shareholders will have a little giddy up in their step. And for good reason. In the last year, the Mulally makeover has kicked in gear and revved up Ford's once idling profit engine and stock price.

  • Car Keys and Money

    The real appeal of GM owning the old GMAC would be in making the company more attractive for an IPO.

  • Toyota headquarters

    Let's see if this makes sense. In the fiscal year that ended in March of 2009, Toyota lost $4.4 billion. A year later, after what was arguably the worst crisis in the company's history, Toyota swung to a profit of just over $2.2 billion. How did that happen?