Back from the Brink: 5 years later

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  • NetNet.TV: Five years after the crisis

    The economy has come back a long ways from the brink, but clearly much needs to be done. As usual, the NetNet TV gang was split over where we stand.

  • Why the public distrusts Wall Street

    It has been 5 years since Lehman Brothers' demise almost led the to the nation's financial collapse. CNBC's John Harwood explains why time has not healed Main Street's view of Wall Street. Lawrence McDonald, Newedge USA , and Dennis Kelleher, Better Markets, discuss whether anything's changed.

  • Hank Paulson

    No one had ever seen anything like it, former Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson told CNBC on Friday—nearly five years after Lehman Brothers went down.

  • Why America hates Wall Street

    Despite 401(k)s nearing record highs, and the stock market inching toward all-time highs, an NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll shows Americans' dislike for Wall Street. CNBC's John Harwood reports the story.

  • Five years ago was the beginning of the global credit meltdown and as CNBC's Rick Santelli reflects, he says the new normal is a mediocre normal.

  • Richard Kovacevich in 2007.

    The TARP financial industry bailout was one of the "worst decisions in the history of the United States," former Wells Fargo boss Richard Kovacevich told CNBC.

  • AIG's CEO shares comeback story

    Robert Benmosche, AIG president and CEO, reveals how his company came back from the brink of bankruptcy to repay the government in full.

  • September 15, 2008, the day the 150-year-old Lehman Brothers declared bankruptcy.

    Five years after the collapse of Lehman Bros. and the bailout of AIG, regulators insist that the banking system is safer. But critics say not so fast.

  • Lessons from the financial crisis of 2008

    Jessica Bibliowicz, former Chairman & CEO of National Financial Partners, shares her reflections on the huge blow to the U.S. banking system five years ago and how she led her business back from the brink.

  • The financial crisis cost $6 trillion to $14 trillion along with "special treatment" that too-big-to-fail banks received, according to the Dallas Fed.

  • Four months ago something troubling happened in the housing market: Home affordability fell below its long-term trend.

  • FHA entering bailout territory

    CNBC's Diana Olick reports on the current role of the Federal Housing Administration following the great economic downfall in 2008. Phil Angelides, former financial Crisis Inquiry Commission Chair, rates the success of new regulators, including Dodd-Frank and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

  • Bank lending is on the rise. The little guy on Main Street is not feeling it, though, so many entrepreneurs are turning to alternative funding sources.

  • Winding down Fannie & Freddie

    Five years after the government takeover of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the agencies are now making money hand over fist, reports CNBC's Diana Olick.

  • Baby Boomers retirement

    Big returns have not convinced many retail investors that the market is not still stacked against them—a plaything controlled by central bankers and computers.

  • The former Citigroup chief also warned in a CNBC interview that the financial industry will be ineffective if new regulations are too restrictive.

  • Mortgage market & what's next

    CNBC's Diana Olick reports on the leading proposal in Congress to do away with Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

  • Five years ago, the government abandoned Lehman Brothers to its fate. Was that a mistake, or did it help bring the financial crisis under control?

  • Picking up the economic pieces

    CNBC's Steve Liesman; Secretary Neal Wolin, former Treasury Secretary, and Lee Sachs, Alliance Partners, provide their perspective on the outlook on the U.S. economy.

  • The Federal Reserve

    In the nearly five years since the Lehman bankruptcy, two former Treasury officials disagree over whether Fed policy will lead to another crisis.

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