Politics Barack Obama

  • Unemployment

    With unemployment surging and President Obama's poll ratings sinking, there’s growing debate about what—if anything—he can do about the situation.

  • As President Obama takes the stage tonight, he will discuss many issues surrounding Afghanistan. One issue he apparently won't be discussing is how to pay for this surge.

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    A funny thing happened on the way to Armageddon. The world did not end.  While many of us preached doom a year ago, some were sellin’ the hope. Here are predictions for 2010, which are also a bit bold and optimistic.

  • The Fed hikes rates three times, Congress seeks more control over the central bank and Obama moves closer to the middle on fiscal policy.

  • Stuff your emergency fund with cash

    How much do you know about your credit cards? Take Suze Ormon's quiz and find out.

  • The US government will have to cut down on borrowing by giving up on some publicly-financed programs or face inflation in one or two years, Sam Zell, chairman of Equity Group Investment, told CNBC Tuesday.

  • Foreclosed Home

    Faced with sluggish progress in its foreclosure-prevention effort, the Obama administration will spend the coming weeks cracking down on mortgage companies that aren't doing enough to help borrowers at risk of losing their homes.

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    In the otherwise ponderous and unhurried context of global climate negotiations, the past two weeks have seen a variety of gripping twists. The New York Times has the story.

  • Despite the Dubai World distraction, the Street is very much focused on U.S.-based events.

  • The Carbon Challenge - A CNBC Special Report

    Here’s a clip-and-save cheat sheet, suitable for framing or taping to your refrigerator, that will save you time—and money—as you try to crack the carbon code for yourself, your business and your investments in the months and years ahead.

  • car_lot_AP.jpg

    Thousands of drivers on the nation's roads don't carry auto insurance, despite laws in all but two states requiring it.

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    Big banks are roaring back. At crisis' edge last year, they are repaying billions of dollars dumped into their vaults to rescue them. Dividend checks are accumulating at the Treasury. Taxpayers won't recoup the full sum of the government's unprecedented infusion to the financial sector, but the returns are ahead of schedule.

  • The axle that is health care reform, and around which Washington is wrapped, threatens to scuttle the Presidents domestic agenda while he frustratingly tries to reach out to foreign allies (or non allies as the case may be).

  • US Capitol Building with cash

    The ultralow interest rates the U.S. has been paying on its colossal debt may not last much longer, and the White House estimates that the tab will exceed $700 billion a year in 2019, the New York Times reported.

  • In U.S. President Barack Obama's speech to Asia-Pacific leaders at the APEC Summit in Singapore over the weekend, he highlighted the importance of a strong China economy in the context of global growth.

  • Health Care Reform

    Moderate Senate Democrats threatened Sunday to scuttle health-care legislation if their demands aren't met, while more liberal members warned their party leaders not to bend.

  • A trader takes a break outside of the NYSE.

    The American stock market has soared 64 percent since it hit bottom eight months ago.  And that leaves it just where it was more than 11 years ago.

  • US Capitol Building with cash

    Now that unemployment has topped 10 percent, some liberal-leaning economists see confirmation of their warnings that the $787 billion stimulus package President Obama signed into law last February was way too small. The economy needs a second big infusion, they say.

  • Stethescope and money

    With no margin for rebellion, Senate Democrats pushed toward a crucial weekend test vote on their sweeping health care bill Friday, and wavering moderates appeared to be falling in line on President Barack Obama's signature issue.

  • Sold sign

    Designed to help low-income people afford to buy houses, the Federal Housing Administration's is now insuring houses for increasingly well-off buyers, says the New York Times.