Politics Barack Obama

  • Health Care Reform

    President Barack Obama is urging Congress to finally push through his massive health care overhaul, freshening it with a handful of Republican ideas in a gesture of bipartisanship but strongly signaling Democrats will go it alone.

  • Jim Bunning

    By maintaining a quixotic filibuster against a Senate jobless bill, Senator Jim Bunning lit the fire of Democratic and Republican hyperbole against him.

  • Americans on both the right and left are frustrated with Washington, and that's being reflected in recent polls and special elections, Jon Corzine, the former governor of New Jersey told CNBC  Wednesday.

  • Toyota's safety crisis may have cleared the way for U.S. automakers, but that is just an aside. The entire industry is poised for a strong recovery. And here are three reasons why

  • Cost of healthcare

    Obama planned to send a letter to Democratic congressional leaders later in the day detailing his plan and make a statement at the White House on Wednesday.

  • Government Regulation

    More than a year after Lehman Brothers' collapse set off a financial panic, Senate negotiators are laboring to seal a deal over a consumer protection dispute holding up broad legislation to establish new rules for Wall Street.

  • If you look to Congress, or the political class in general, leadership seems to be getting to where the crowd is already going and pretending you led them there.

  • Cost of healthcare

    Positions were formed long ago and the talk-fest provided photo ops and little more. Observers took away what they wanted.

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    Getting past "Pearl Harbor." This is part one of the transcript and video of Warren Buffett's 'Ask Warren' appearance on CNBC's Squawk Box on Monday, March 1, 2010.

  • Investors need to always focus on the fundamentals, he says. That way they don’t miss great moneymaking opportunities.

  • John Podesta

    The Obama administration is planning to use the government’s enormous buying power to prod private companies to improve wages and benefits for millions of workers, according to White House officials and several interest groups briefed on the plan.

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    Many in the investment world — and even President Barack Obama's administration — are taking a fresh look at annuities, and are finding there's a lot there to like.

  • Even though investors get another dose of Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke in Washington, D.C., the problems in Greece have crept back to the forefront of investor concerns. The issue today is whether the country can cut the budget enough to help the situation. And the big deal on Wall Street involves Coca-Cola and Coca-Cola Enterprises.

  • Clearly Ben worries that we are a ways from shaking off the effects of the financial meltdown. In his testimony he said he would need to see a rebound in employment, housing, and bank lending before he would feel a sustained recovery is at hand. That is pretty clear as to what has to be obvious before rates come down.

  • Fed Chairman Bernanke again committed to keeping interest rates "exceptionally low for an extended period" to support a "nascent" economic recovery. At the same time, Bernanke seemed to infer that he did not believe the economy was yet growing on a self-sustaining basis.

  • doctor

    If you've been confused by year-long wrangling over health care reform, and the fierce differences between the parties, let me try to make it simple.

  • Stocks rallied Wednesday as the dollar pulled back and Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke pledged to keep rates low for a long time. Financials were among the top gainers.

  • Despite a fairly decent earnings report out of Toll Brothers this morning, some concerns linger over the state of the housing industry. Toll’s CEO Robert Toll pointed out that the speed of a housing recover has been “hard to discern” due to “unevenness in demand” the homebuilder has seen since September.

  • Stocks rallied Wednesday as the dollar pulled back and Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke pledged to keep rates low for a long time. Financials were among the top gainers.

  • Timothy Geithner

    Assessing a tough governmental juggling act, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner assured lawmakers Wednesday that stimulus spending to spur the economy now isn't in conflict with a need for longer-term austerity.