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Politics Barack Obama

  • Cramer interviews Westport Innvations CEO David Demers about Obama's endorsement of natural gas and more.

  • Timothy Geithner

    The US recovery will continue, despite financial turmoil in Europe, as long the governments on the continent follow through on their promised rescue package, Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner told CNBC Thursday.

  • Brian Kelly explains what to look for when the May employment report is released Friday.

  • Sources tell CNBC that the SEC’s new single stock circuit breaker rules will likely go into effect next week. The proposed rules, created in response to the May 6 market plunge, would halt trading in a stock for five minutes “in the event that..."

  • Plus, get calls on smartphones, cloud computing and more.

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    A microbial product called HTP, derived from peat moss, could  "literally eat the oil" in the Gulf of Mexico, according to the CEO of a company that sells it.

  • Rod Blagojevich

    The corruption trial of Rod Blagojevich began Thursday, 18 months after authorities arrested him at home one morning and accused him of trying to sell the Senate seat that President Barack Obama had vacated for the White House.

  • Once again the markets are struggling to string two days of gains together (tired of hearing that yet?). Following yesterday’s strong close and the modestly higher open this (Thursday) morning, stocks are losing steam.

  • President Barack Obama

    For the first time since Barack Obama’s inauguration 16 months ago, we’re beginning to think there’s a reasonable chance he’ll be just a one-term president.

  • The Israeli-Turkish alliance so abruptly shattered in the past few days may have been born of military necessity, but it was still real.

  • Stock futures were slightly higher early Thursday, as European and Asian markets have rebounded strongly following yesterday’s rally in the U.S. Futures have held steady throughout the morning with their gains intact even after the flurry of economic data and retail sales reports this morning.

  • Contract workers from BP ferry oil soaked waste to a pickup point as other workers use skimmers to clean oil from a marsh near Pass a Loutre on June 1, 2010 near Venice, Louisiana. Earlier in the day, U.S. President Barack Obama called the Deepwater Horizon accident the 'greatest environmental disaster of its kind in our history.'

    The chatter began weeks ago as armchair engineers brainstormed for ways to stop the torrent of oil spilling into the Gulf of Mexico: What about nuking the well?  The NYT reports.

  • Plus, get calls on Apple, AT&T and more.

  • In almost a flip-flop of yesterday (Tuesday), the markets posted a strong late-day rally Wednesday afternoon. The major indices finished the day up well over 2 percent, closing the session at the highs of the day — quite a contrast to yesterday’s drop at the end of the day. Leading the rally today are sectors that were noticeably beaten up yesterday...

  • President Barack Obama

    Seizing on a disastrous oil spill to advance his agenda, President Barack Obama on Wednesday called on Congress to roll back billions of dollars in tax breaks for oil and send him a clean-energy bill that would help the nation end its "fossil fuel addiction" for good.

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    President Obama’s push for higher fuel-efficiency standards for diesel-guzzling, long-haul trucks may be laudable but is probably unachievable by the target date without more development of key technologies,

  • Unemployment

    Unemployment is expected to only fall to 9.8 percent from 9.9 in April, because many sidelined adults, sensing improved conditions, started looking for work. The big challenge is to keep GDP growing at least 3 percent to pull down unemployment.

  • Job Search

    You are a member of the Senate, and you’re starting to get spooked by the deficit. Polls show that voters are worried about it. Economists are, too. Something needs to change.

  • After losing steam late in the session yesterday (Tuesday), stocks had pointed to a higher open this morning. (Note: US markets did open higher, led by energy and financials.) But in a fairly rare sight, stock futures are advancing as the U.S. Dollar Index rises and commodities fall.

  • What's Next?

    Just how much the US economy will expand this year and next remains a question among economists—with the wild card being the impact of European turmoil on US growth.