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Politics Barack Obama

  • Wall Street has done a bit of an about-face on health care reform in the past few weeks—while the Street for the most part is strongly opposed to the bill, analysts are increasingly pointing out potential positives in addition to negatives.

  • That’s how it’s always been, the Mad Money host says.

  • Health-care reform is now law, but it comes at some cost to investors. Because part of the bill that President Obama signed on March 23 includes increased taxes on capital gains and dividends.Now, Cramer always has recommended dividend stocks as great protection again economic and market volatility. But if investors are pocketing less money as a result of higher taxes, then this strategy has to change.The solution then, as he sees it, is to find even bigger dividend yields. That way investors st

    Cramer pulled together a basket of some of his top dividend-paying companies. It’s a starter kit of sorts, a diversified mini-portfolio that should protect investors against the tax man.

  • Cost of healthcare

    High-income families would be hit with a tax increase on wages and a new levy on investments under President Obama's health care bill.

  • House Democrats are pushing to pass the health care bill as Pres. Obama seeks to rally recalcitrant congresspeople. Which stocks and sectors actually stand to benefit from the bill? Les Funtleyder, health care strategist at Miller Tabak, Jason Gurda, managed care analyst at Leerink Swann and Ralph Giacobbe, analyst at Credit Suisse First Boston offered their insights and investment recommendations.

  • Stethescope and money

    An organization that is supposed to represent the interest of 59,000 Catholic nuns has come out in favor of the Senate version of the health care bill despite language that allows Federal money for abortions. I didn't think there were 59,000 nuns in the world. And I don't need that many to tell me anything.

  • There are a few warnings signs materializing this morning ... We've had two days of weakness in energy stocks. Traders note that energy stocks have outperformed the commodities dramatically over the last few months. The dollar strength is also pressuring commodities. Still, the market has advanced this week on numerous positives...

  • Volume yesterday was again below expectations, despite this being quadruple witching (the quarterly expiration of stock and index futures, and stock and index options). One trader who specializes in volatility and options blamed it on March Madness. Silly, I know, but it makes sense.

  • Rep. Steny Hoyer

    U.S. House of Representatives Democratic leader Steny Hoyer said Friday that Democrats would have the support necessary to pass the healthcare reform bill in a vote expected Sunday.

  • My old pal Jim Cramer and I reunited last night to discuss the impact Obama-Care will have on the stock market and economy if it passes.

  • Tomorrow (Friday), the S&P 500 will be conducting its quarterly rebalancing. The S&P is weighted by market capitalization, so changes in the share count of companies trigger changes in the relative weightings of the individual stocks in the S&P. Here's a breakdown...

  • Cost of healthcare

    The revised health care bill that Democrats released in advance of a House vote this weekend contained one initial mystery: how did they revise the Senate health care bill to make it more generous to the uninsured while simultaneously shaving more from the federal budget deficit?

  • These five high-yielding stocks could shield you from what Cramer thinks is a coming sell-off – or two.

  • Cost of healthcare

    But here’s what I do know: Obamacare’s worst tax hike is the imposition of a new 3.9 percent Medicare payroll tax on capital gains and other investments.

  • obama_signing.jpg

    In a sunny Rose Garden ceremony, Obama said the legislation will help the private sector start hiring again.  It is the first of several jobs measures promised by Democrats this year.

  • soda_machines_200.jpg

    At a time when political leaders in Europe and the United States are committed to no additional income-tax burden on the middle class, they also share the advantage of raising revenue without drawing too much attention to the tightening fiscal noose.

  • S&P Futures little changed as the February Consumer Price Index (CPI) showed virtually no inflation pressure. And: As the S&P 500 hit another new high yesterday, traders were passing around lots of technical charts, in particular noting that the Relative Strength Index (RSI) is in unusally overbought territory.

  • Cynics will note that ever since Mr. Volcker and Mr. Bernanke have been testifying, the market has drifted lower. Regardless. There are a number of positive factors behind today's modest move, which—given that the S&P 500 is up 12 out of 14 days—can only be described as a meltup.

  • Hartford Financial may float their $1.45 billion common stock offering to pay off TARP debt as early as tonight, traders tell me. HIG's announcement that they would be repurchasing the $3.4 billion of its preferred shares issued to the Treasury under the TARP program may spur others to pay off their TARP debt. Why now?

  • Surgeons

    President Barack Obama's much-challenged health care overhaul gained traction Wednesday as a liberal lawmaker became the first to switch his opposition and Catholic nuns declared their support in an unusual public break with the bishops.