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Politics Barack Obama

  • Honeywell model T87 thermostat

    Honeywell International increased its first-quarter earnings outlook Tuesday and said it will log a $13 million non-cash charge in relation to the recent health care overhaul legislation.

  • With all these governors raising sales taxes on pole-dancing and everything else in sight, here's a guy with the political will and leadership to cut spending on education, health and union pensions without raising taxes in order to close a $4 billion deficit.

  • Another slow melt-up. Every day, the Dow goes up...20 points. The Dow is up 17 trading days in March, and down only four. It hasn't put together two down days since the last week of February. That's impressive. What is not impressive: volume, and the advance/decline line is definitely showing signs of slowing down. Not a good sign.

  • We started the day with the Dow Industrials within 60 points of 11,000...but faded as Europe closed on the lows of the day at the same time as the euro hit its lows. Greece, which priced a 5 billion euro 7-year bond offering on Monday, attempted a follow-up 1 billion euro sale this morning, but the market didn't seem to be interested.

  • American healthcare reform

    An association representing 300 large corporations is pressing for the repeal a provision of the health care overhaul that prompted AT&T, Caterpillar  and other companies to announce substantial charges, the NYT reports.

  • US Capitol Building with cash

    We are facing an across-the-board tax-hike assault from federal, state, and local sources. This, despite a precarious outlook of a return to long-term economic prosperity after an especially deep and painful recession.

  • President Obama signs the health care reform bill into law at the White House

    More than a week after President Obama signed the sweeping new health care law, which will eventually provide insurance coverage for 32 million uninsured Americans, many of us are still scratching our heads. What just happened? And how and when will we start feeling its effect? the NYT explains.

  • The Greek stock market down 1.8 percent as the sale of the 7 year bond did not go as well as initially thought. Yields are higher, to 6.24 percent. And: We are waiting to see if the spate of strong IPOs will continue. Expecting Primerica to price 18 million shares between $12-$14, likely tonight, possibly tomorrow. This is the largest financial services marketing organization in North America.

  • The US' Citigroup common share sale news is no surprise, but hopefully it will sun a light on the potential windfall for taxpayers. The government owns 7.7 billion shares at $3.25. Right now, at roughly $4.25, it is sitting on a $7.7 billion profit. Whether they can get that price over the next several months depends on a number of factors. Let’s look at two broad issues.

  • The Dayton Daily News in a cartoon challenges Vice President Joe Biden to say that three times quickly. It could make for a great spot on U-tube.

  • We’ve talked quite a bit in Investor Brief about investors trying to identify where the growth is and how, in many cases, the most explosive growth is outside the United States.

  • International markets are to the upside, for the most part. The Shanghai Composite closed up 2.1 percent and is now at a 9 week high. Greece announced plans for a new 5 billion euro seven-year bond that will yield about 6 percent. The dollar is falling for the second straight day as waning sovereign debt concerns in Europe. That is giving strength to commodities in early trade.

  • Barack Obama

    Barack Obama arrived unannounced in Afghanistan on Sunday, his first visit to the war zone that could define his presidency since his election as U.S. commander-in-chief.

  • employment_new.jpg

    It's all about jobs and rising interest rates in the week ahead—and the two are not unrelated. The March employment report next week is expected to show the first real signs of job growth since the recovery began.

  • Cost of healthcare

    Now that President Obama has rammed through his trillion-dollar gut renovation of U.S. health care, here are six provocative questions on what we have wrought.

  • AT&T joins Deere and Caterpillar in taking a charge (in this case, $1 billion) due to the health care reform bill. You will be hearing this from many companies. In this case, there is a charge to earnings this quarter for companies that get a 28 percent subsidy from the feds for prescription drug coverage for their Medicare retirees. That subsidy is being reduced.

  • Forget Greece or Treasury rates — the biggest frustration for traders remains the lack of volatility, which has led to woefully low volumes for the past month. Don’t let yesterday’s little blip up fool you, the action has been lousy recently. Why does this matter?

  • European banks trading higher as a deal to help Greece has crystallized: coordinate bilateral news from euro countries, with the partial help of the IMF. Regardless: traders (who don't normally talk politics) are passing around articles about elections in Germany, France and Italy...

  • Having had a son live in Italy for four years some time ago I got very comfortable with the lira. I loved spending a million or two for a cup of coffee. It was an out of mind experience to think in lira type numbers. It looks like there might be a chance to go back to the good old days.

  • Social Security Check

    The system is projected to pay out more in benefits this year than it receives in taxes, a tipping point toward insolvency that was not expected before 2016.