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Politics Barack Obama

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    There’s too much liquidity and optimism to be short and not enough fundamental, constructive traction to be long.

  • A lot of people doubt the president’s reforms will become law. Bu the Mad Money host isn’t so sure anymore.

  • One little surprise: some form of the Volcker rule appears to be in the bill, which would limit proprietary trading activities, and—f early indications are correct—would limit banks from investing in or sponsoring hedge funds or private equity funds.

  • Credit card trends improving: Capital One reported net charge-offs (loans unlikely to be collected) declined to 10.19 percent, from 10.41 percent in January.

  • Cost of healthcare

    President Obama is going all in on the health care plan. He postponed an overseas trip to be on hand for a hoped for vote on the plan this coming Friday.

  • U.S. economic growth as measured by real GDP will top 5 percent in 2010, and the unemployment rate will fall below 9 percent, said Byron Wien, vice president of Blackstone Advisory Services, who shared his annual top 10 surprises with CNBC Tuesday.

  • 2010 Toyota Prius

    Investigators with Toyota and the federal government were unable to make a Prius speed out of control as its owner did on a California highway, casting doubt about the driver's account.

  • NYSE Traders

    Stocks may have a hard time finding traction ahead of the Fed's Tuesday meeting, but the trend for the market is clearly higher, strategists say.

  • Janet L. Yellen

    The new Obama Fed is going to be very dovish when it comes to fighting future inflation and defending the value of the dollar.

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    By setting risk retention requirements at each step of the process, the very legislation intended to avoid a housing crisis could drastically reduce liquidity and cripple the ability of the secondary mortgage market to deliver hundreds of billions of dollars of low cost mortgage credit needed each year.

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    American families are $340 billion wealthier according to the Federal Reserve’s latest batch of household-net-worth data...I believe this is contributing not only to a better economy, but also to better consumer spending.

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    The President took the dragon by the horns and addressed the currency issue...Without question, this was the most direct and formal attack on the Chinese currency regime to date from the Obama administration.

  • S&P futures moved up about 4 points as February retail sales were much stronger than expected, up 0.3 percent vs. consensus of a drop of 0.2 percent; ex-autos up 0.9 percent, also way better than decline of 0.2 percent expected. These are impressive numbers, especially given the snowstorms.

  • S&P 500 closes at 1150.24, a 52-week high. One of the last technical hurdles was breached at the close today, as the S&P 500 closed at its highest level since October 1, 2008. The big cap index has now joined the Nasdaq, Russell 2000 and S&P Midcap, all at new highs. How strong has this slow melt-up been?

  • Financial reform is in trouble. The Democrats going their own way on financial reform makes the whole effort more problematic. The death of financial reform would be a short term positive for bank stocks (market views lack of change as good, no matter what is passed it will hurt earnings) but in the long run a negative, as these businesses need a more comprehensive regulatory structure. Why..?

  • Toyota car grille

    A top government auto safety official tells Congress that his agency may need more authority to regulate the auto industry.

  • This has been another big week for bond issuance...on the heels of the successful Citigroup sale of trust preferreds (a hybrid instrument), Bank of America, GMAC, Novartis Capital, DirecTV, MGM Mirage and Royal Bank of Scotland have all sold bonds this week. Prices have dramatically improved: MGM, for instance, sold $845 million in notes Tuesday night at a yield of only 9 percent.

  • Health Care Reform

    House Democratic leaders Thursday walked their rank-and-file members through last-minute agreements that could move President Barack Obama's overhaul of the nation's health care system a step closer to reality.

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    US regulators told banks not to increase dividends or buy back shares until political (and economic) uncertainty around the industry dissipates. They have to be smoking something. Define the end of political uncertainty.

  • Gary Gensler

    For 18 years, Gary G. Gensler worked on Wall Street, striking merger deals at the venerable Goldman Sachs. Today, he is emerging as one of the nation’s archreformers, pushing to impose some of the most stringent new financial regulations in history. The New York Times reports.