Politics Barack Obama

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  • With his victory in South Carolina on Saturday, Senator John McCain of Arizona has accomplished what no other Republican presidential candidate has been able to do this year: he has captured two competitive contests. Not incidentally, this one was in the state that effectively sank his campaign in 2000.

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    Mitt Romney's big win in Michigan last night signals that both parties have wide-open 2008 nomination races--but for much different reasons. Republicans are dispirited and divided, about the merits of their candidates and also about hot-button issues such as immigration and abortion.

  • The convincing victory by Mitt Romney in the Michigan primary on Tuesday means three very different states — with dissimilar electorates driven by distinctive sets of priorities — have embraced three separate candidates in search of someone who can lead the party into a tough election and beyond President Bush.

  • Mitt Romney

    Mitt Romney scored a breakthrough win in the Michigan primary on Tuesday, reviving his struggling campaign, halting rival John McCain's momentum and further scrambling a chaotic Republican presidential race with no clear front-runner.

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    Received political wisdom is running smack into economic reality. It’s not yet clear which force will prove more powerful. For presidential contenders, the collision takes place in Michigan, Nevada and South Carolina.

  • STANDISH, Mich. — This quiet town, tucked between the thumb and the rest of the fingers in Michigan’s mitten, feels worlds away from the struggling automobile factories of Flint and Detroit. But economic gloom has made its way here just as it has seeped through so much of this state.

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    Like nearly everyone else who works in or around politics, I was stunned by Hillary Clinton's victory over Barack Obama in New Hampshire. My expectation of events turned out to be wholly wrong. I am less embarrassed by that, than thrilled that the electorate we dissect so constantly remains capable of delivering such a surprise.

  • John Kerry, United States Senator from Massachusetts

    Senator John Kerry is set to endorse the presidential candidacy of Senator Barack Obama at a rally here today, the first of several high-profile Democrats expected to announce their support for Mr. Obama in his fight to win the party’s nomination.

  • Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton

    Hillary Clinton stands behind no Democratic presidential candidate in her scorn for George W. Bush, but that isn’t stopping her from implementing Mr. Bush’s 2000 political strategy against John McCain. In one notable consequence of the front-loaded 2008 political calendar, she used it before the New Hampshire primary, not after.

  • Secretary of State Hillary Clinton

    Democrat Hillary Clinton defied the polls and narrowly upset Barack Obama in New Hampshire on Tuesday, breathing new life into her U.S. presidential campaign after finishing third in Iowa.

  • Voting in New Hampshire ends at 8 p.m. EST on Tuesday, with results expected to begin rolling in quickly.

  • Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (AP Photo/The Meridian Star, Kyle Carter)

    A teary-eyed Hillary Clinton pushed for support on Monday as polls showed her poised for a huge New Hampshire loss to Democratic rival Barack Obama, but the former front-runner vowed to carry on with her presidential quest even if she loses.

  • Barack Obama

    Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton battled to keep crucial New Hampshire from swinging to rival Barack Obama, but new polls showed him jumping into the lead.

  • Goldman Sachs analysts say stock investors should look to larger cap and defensive sectors as a way to play the uncertainty of presidential primary season. While they say the major party nominees should become clear by "Super Duper Tuesday," there is greater electoral and policy uncertainty in this Presidential race because there are no incumbents running.

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    This is the time of the presidential race when the convergence of politicians and press is nearly complete. The Radisson, in downtown Manchester, is the closest thing there is to ground zero of the New Hampshire campaign. All the networks of NBC are broadcasting from this spot and thus all the candidates are coming here.

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    This week, New Hampshire becomes the gateway to a new political world--engaging multiple constituencies, playing out over a vast terrain, shifting the psychology of competition. But as the 2008 campaign moves toward contests in Michigan, Nevada, South Carolina, Florida, then half the country on Feb. 5, the simplicity and careful planning of Iowa and New Hampshire phase give way to a complex, high-velocity game of survivor.

  • Fried Shrimp

    "MLK??!!? MLK?!?!? Hey man, this guy is no Martin." So says the guy a couple of tables over. He's responding to another fella here at Big Jim's off Highway 253 in Southern Georgia who has just compared Barack Obama to Dr. King and Robert Kennedy.

  • Nonfarm payrolls up just 18,000, well short of expectations of 70,000, weakest since August 2003. The November number was revised upward to 115,000 from 94,000 and futures dropped ten points initially. The dollar weakened.

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    Barack Obama took a big step on Thursday toward becoming the first black U.S. president as his campaign for change caught fire in Iowa and swept him past Hillary Clinton in the opening Democratic nominating contest.

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    Want a sign of how much big, costlier and more ambitious the Democratic caucus efforts is this year compared to four years ago? Consider these two facts: Four years ago, eventual winner John Kerry entered caucus night with 300 drivers prepared to haul supporters to caucus sites. This year, says former Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack, Hillary Clinton's campaign has 5,000 of them.