Politics Barack Obama

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  • Secretary of State Hillary Clinton

    Democrat Hillary Clinton defied the polls and narrowly upset Barack Obama in New Hampshire on Tuesday, breathing new life into her U.S. presidential campaign after finishing third in Iowa.

  • Voting in New Hampshire ends at 8 p.m. EST on Tuesday, with results expected to begin rolling in quickly.

  • Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (AP Photo/The Meridian Star, Kyle Carter)

    A teary-eyed Hillary Clinton pushed for support on Monday as polls showed her poised for a huge New Hampshire loss to Democratic rival Barack Obama, but the former front-runner vowed to carry on with her presidential quest even if she loses.

  • Barack Obama

    Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton battled to keep crucial New Hampshire from swinging to rival Barack Obama, but new polls showed him jumping into the lead.

  • Goldman Sachs analysts say stock investors should look to larger cap and defensive sectors as a way to play the uncertainty of presidential primary season. While they say the major party nominees should become clear by "Super Duper Tuesday," there is greater electoral and policy uncertainty in this Presidential race because there are no incumbents running.

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    This is the time of the presidential race when the convergence of politicians and press is nearly complete. The Radisson, in downtown Manchester, is the closest thing there is to ground zero of the New Hampshire campaign. All the networks of NBC are broadcasting from this spot and thus all the candidates are coming here.

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    This week, New Hampshire becomes the gateway to a new political world--engaging multiple constituencies, playing out over a vast terrain, shifting the psychology of competition. But as the 2008 campaign moves toward contests in Michigan, Nevada, South Carolina, Florida, then half the country on Feb. 5, the simplicity and careful planning of Iowa and New Hampshire phase give way to a complex, high-velocity game of survivor.

  • Fried Shrimp

    "MLK??!!? MLK?!?!? Hey man, this guy is no Martin." So says the guy a couple of tables over. He's responding to another fella here at Big Jim's off Highway 253 in Southern Georgia who has just compared Barack Obama to Dr. King and Robert Kennedy.

  • Nonfarm payrolls up just 18,000, well short of expectations of 70,000, weakest since August 2003. The November number was revised upward to 115,000 from 94,000 and futures dropped ten points initially. The dollar weakened.

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    Barack Obama took a big step on Thursday toward becoming the first black U.S. president as his campaign for change caught fire in Iowa and swept him past Hillary Clinton in the opening Democratic nominating contest.

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    Want a sign of how much big, costlier and more ambitious the Democratic caucus efforts is this year compared to four years ago? Consider these two facts: Four years ago, eventual winner John Kerry entered caucus night with 300 drivers prepared to haul supporters to caucus sites. This year, says former Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack, Hillary Clinton's campaign has 5,000 of them.

  • Iowa map

    Here are three things to watch for when Iowans vote tonight: 1) Mobilization: if Democratic turnout is huge, that's a sign that Barack Obama has succeeded in pulling out enough independent voters to win. It would also show the energy and enthusiasm that Democrats hope will give them an edge in the general election.

  • Snapshots from the closing hours of the Iowa caucus: Song choices: At John Edwards rallies, Bruce Springsteen's "The Rising." At Barack Obama's, Stevie Wonder's "Signed, Sealed and Delivered." At Hillary Clinton's, Dolly Parton's "9 to 5." At Mike Huckabee's rally in Des Moines last night, it was "Sweet Home Alabama" --except the candidate himself was on stage strumming guitar with a local band.

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    Warren Buffett will be appearing live three times on CNBC and CNBC.com Tuesday in connection with the fund-raiser he's hosting in San Francisco for Hillary Clinton's presidential bid.   The first live interview on CNBC is scheduled for 10:15a ET, with a joint Buffett-Clinton interview planned for late in the afternoon.  The fund-raiser itself will be streamed live on CNBC.com

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    In a live interview this afternoon on CNBC with Hillary Clinton standing by his side, Warren Buffett again warned that the U.S. could fall into recession, if unemployment increases significantly.  But he said he's not sure that will happen and he's been surprised that the employment market has held up as well as it has so far.

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    I can't help noticing the dramatic difference between the political and government parts of my beat these days--complete gridlock in Washington and turbulent action on the 2008 campaign trail. In the capital, Democrats and Republicans are fighting over literally everything--the budget, energy legislation, a fix for the out of control Alternative Minimum Tax.

  • Barack Obama

    A fresh round of polls has underscored the sense of flux in the 2008 presidential race--in both parties. A Washington Post-ABC News poll of Iowa Democrats shows a three-way race for the Jan 3 caucuses--but with Barack Obama, not Hillary Clinton, in the lead.

  • Before the campaign is done, the TV ads will run the full range from nutty to nasty and tens of millions of Americans will battleground states will see them. But for now, candidate commercials are largely confined to Iowa and New Hampshire television screens. And they are having an impact.

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    It's getting hot out there on the presidential 2008 trail as voting time draws closer. Here are a few things to remember as you watch the rhetorical and advertising bullets fly: 1. There's NOTHING wrong with drawing contrasts with an opponent--aka "going negative"--if there's a solid basis for it.

  • Hillary Clinton performed strongly at last night's Democratic debate in Nevada. She needed too, after a difficult two weeks in which she harmed her own cause and Barack Obama found his stride. But that doesn't mean that the "Clinton is champ" storyline is any more certain now than the "Obama is surging" was last week.