Europe Top News and Analysis Belgium

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    A top German official at the European Central Bank on Monday defended the bank’s plans to intervene in bond markets to push down borrowing costs for businesses and encourage economic growth. The position puts him at odds with the president of Germany's central bank and highlights a growing split in the country’s policy-making elite.

  • Greek Parliament

    Greece's official lenders are signaling a growing reluctance to keep paying the bills of the nearly bankrupt nation, even as the government seeks leniency on its bailout terms.

  • European Union Flag

    Signs that cracks in the euro zone are widening sent markets on the Continent down sharply on Monday, as doubts grew about Greece’s ability to make good on its debt payments and Spain’s economy — the region’s fourth largest — was straining under the pressure of the government’s austerity measures, the NYT reports.

  • According to the National Association of Convenience Stores, 2011 was a good year for the industry. Sales  prompting NACS Chairman Tom Robinson to conclude that “one-stop shopping and speed of service for refreshments, food and fuel… continues to resonate with our customers.”Perhaps no convenience store chain in the U.S. is as well-known as 7-Eleven, originator of the Slurpee and the Big Gulp. It operates over  throughout the country, but nearly twice that amount is found in Japan, home of Seven

    CNBC presents a list of 10 foreign-owned brands, businesses and landmarks that are perceived by the public to be as American as it gets.

  • Euro coin in front of the giant symbol of the Euro outside the headquarters of the European Central Bank.

    The euro's slide has been steep lately, but this strategist sees some leveling out ahead.

  • Cigarettes

    For years, law enforcement officers and smugglers have played cat and mouse in Europe, where contraband cigarettes are stashed in everything from furniture shipments to loads of Christmas trees, the New York Times reports.

  • Wall Street sign

    As big banks face the fallout from a global investigation into interest rate manipulation, American and British lawmakers are scrutinizing regulators who failed to take action that might have prevented years of illegal activity, the New York Times reports.

  • Robert Diamond, CEO of Barclays.

    While it was big news when the Barclays chairman, Marcus Agius, resigned Monday over his bank’s role in the Libor rate-fixing scandal. Less noticed was his other resignation that same day, the New York Times reports.

  • French President Francois Hollande (L) speaks with German Chancellor Angela Merkel (R)

    The French President is determined to show the French that he is willing to stand up to Berlin, to push the German Chancellor to contribute even more than before toward a lasting solution of the euro mess. The New York Times reports.

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    The head of the European Central Bank and other euro zone leaders worked on Saturday on a grand vision for the euro zone meant to reassure investors and allies that flaws in the currency union will be addressed quickly.

  • Euro bills

    As Europe works to prop up Spain’s wobbling banks, its leaders still face a problem that plagues the Continent’s increasingly vulnerable financial institutions — a longstanding addiction to the borrowed money that provides the day-to-day financing they need to survive.

  • Spain

    With an agreement to bail out Spain's struggling banks, Europe again avoided financial chaos in a debt crisis that is in its third year. But Europe still faces far bigger challenges that threaten the Continent and with it, the world economy, the New York Times reports.

  • Spain

    The bargaining has begun over a deal to rescue Spain’s ailing banks, confronting Europe with urgent choices about whether to try to enforce onerous bailout terms on Madrid as the crisis spreads to the region’s largest economies. The NYT reports.

  • As European leaders grapple with how to preserve their monetary union, Greece is rapidly running out of money, the New York Times reports.

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    Mario Draghi, the European Central Bank president who pulled the Continent back from the financial brink late last year, is facing an even more daunting challenge as the debt crisis in Spain deepens. But this time, he may have a harder time fashioning a rescue plan that will work, the New York Times reports.

  • European Central Bank

    The European bailout of 130 billion euros ($163.4 billion) that was supposed to buy time for Greece is mainly servicing only the interest on the country’s debt — while the Greek economy continues to struggle, the New York Times reports.

  • Francois Hollande, France's president, arrives for a news conference following the European Leaders (EU) summit at the European Council headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, on Thursday, May 24, 2012.

    French President, Francois Hollande has cast himself as the European leader pushing hardest to forge a growth-oriented “new path” through the euro zone’s grinding debt crisis, pitting him against the austerity-minded German Chancellor Angela Merkel, the New York Times reports.

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    Despite efforts at official reassurance, no one really knows the consequences of a Greek exit from the euro zone, or how rapidly big countries like Spain and Italy, and their banks, will feel the effects, The New York Times reports.

  • manufacturing engineering

    Walking through his high-ceilinged factory here, explaining the production of sheets of copper, M. Brian O’Shaughnessy comes across as a staunch advocate of manufacturing in America.

  • Reichstag Parliment building, Berlin, Germany

    German lawmakers likely will delay a vote on the euro zone's fiscal compact on budget discipline because the country's main opposition party wants to insert growth-focused measures into the pact, a coalition source told CNBC.