Millionaires & Billionaires Billionaires

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  • Jack Kerouac

    Two stunning collections of literary letters are up for sale in New York for more than $5 million.

  • Big Business of Art

    The world's 2,170 billionaires have an average of $31 million each of art, reports CNBC's Robert Frank.

  • A woman bids at auction.

    A new study found that the world's 2,170 billionaires hold an average of $31 million each of art, equal to 0.5 percent of their net worth. Here are the top 10 holders.

  • Bain & Co. predicts that growth in luxury sales will be up to 50 percent slower this year than last. The main reason: Chinese are breaking away from their gift-giving culture and trying not to be ostentatious.

  • Family offices are becoming major players in financial markets. A string of billionaire hedge funders have transformed their funds into family offices. Could SAC be next?

  • Mickey Mouse poses in front of the Sleeping Beauty Castle at Disneyland park outside Paris.

    Disneyland likely says it gives visitors to its theme parks the royal treatment, but if you want to see the park through the eyes of a real prince be prepared to pay up.

  • A slew of recent studies argue that more wealth brings better health: from longer lives to lower disability rates. But wealth may bring a negative side-effect to one group: ladies who lunch, who tend to drink more than is recommended.

  • Actor, comedian, writer, playwright, producer and banjo musician Steve Martin.

    Actor Steve Martin is listing his villa in the posh Caribbean island of St. Barts for 8.75 million euros, or about $11.4 million. If he gets what he's asking, he'll score a nice profit on its sale.

  • Bottles of the finest wine from the cellars of the Elysee Palace went up for auction on May 30, 2013.

    France's auction of wines from the Elysee Palace fetched more than three-times its original estimate. The lofty price was the result of the premium placed on the seller—the French presidential palace.

  • A bottle of the finest wine from the cellars of the Elysee Palace, a 1990 Pomerol Chateau Petrus.

    The two-day auction of 1,200 bottles of wine from the Elysee Palace is on pace to surpass its estimate of $300,000, helped by the sale of a 1990 Petrus for $9,400.

  • The wealthiest 1 percent now control 39 percent of the world's wealth, and their share is likely to grow, according to a new report.

  • Global wealth grew faster in 2012 than in the previous two years, boosting the number of millionaires and improving the outlook of the wealthy, according to studies.

  • Walton 1913 Liberty Head nickel

    One of five Liberty head nickels mistakenly struck at the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia in 1913 eventually sold at auction for more than $3 million.

  • A letter Francis Crick wrote shortly after the discovery of the structure of DNA sold at Christie's for a whopping $5.3 million.

  • This home in Southampton is for rent for only $1,000,000.

    Brokers say there are now at least a half dozen homes and estates in the Hamptons that are renting for around $1 million—just for the summer—a new record.

  • When to Tell the Kids They're Rich

    Every parent should discuss financial matters with their children at some point, with CNBC's Robert Frank.

  • Yachts on a Boat

    Every spring hundreds of yachts migrate from the Caribbean to the Mediterranean and some of them do it by boat, reports CNBC's Robert Frank. (1:00)

  • A growing number of companies are offering "yacht shipping" services, where yachts are loaded and carried on giant cargo ships to distant locations.

  • Survey after survey shows that the wealthy are back to pre-crisis boom years when it comes to their outlook for their own finances, their investments and their retirements. But many of them are still sitting on lots of cash.

  • Bernie Ecclestone is seen at his motorhome with his daughters Tamara Ecclestone (L) and Petra Ecclestone (R).

    A new study from U.S. Trust suggests that millionaire parents often don't tell their children how rich they are until well into adulthood. In fact, most believed their kids should little about the family's wealth before the age of 25.