Trader Talk with Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani
CNBC "On-Air Stocks" Editor

A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani has covered Wall Street and the stock market for nearly 20 years. Pisani covered the real estate market for CNBC from 1990-1995, then moved on to cover corporate management issues before becoming Stocks Correspondent in 1997.

In addition to covering the global stock market, he also covers initial public offerings (IPOs), exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and financial market structure for CNBC.

In 2013, he won Third Place in the National Headliner Awards in the Business and Consumer Reporting category for his documentary on the diamond business, "The Diamond Rush."

In 2014, Pisani was honored with a Recognition Award from the Market Technicians Association for "steadfast efforts to integrate technical analysis into financial decision making, journalism and reporting."

Prior to joining CNBC, Pisani co-authored "Investing in Land: How to Be a Successful Developer." He and his father taught a course in real estate development at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania from 1987-1992. Pisani learned the real estate business from his father, Ralph Pisani, a retired real estate developer.

Follow Bob Pisani on Twitter @BobPisani.

More

  • Stocks are fractionally lower following Ben Bernanke's speech because Mr. Bernanke declined to elaborate on any further stimulus the Federal Reserve might provide, or under what conditions it would do so.

  • Bears are eyeing this tape nervously...why? In theory, bears should be delighted: the language from the ECB was somewhat dovish, with growth targets lowered — and everyone knows September is the worst month for the stock market, right?

  • S&P 500 futures dropped five points, and European equities dipped, as the European Central Bank announced it was leaving interest rates unchanged at 1.5 percent. The Bank of England left it at 0.5 percent, but left open that it may restart its own quantitative easing program. Some disappointment there was no rate cut.

  • An article stating that the SEC is making inquiries about the effect that leveraged and inverse ETFs are having on market volatility has caused a wave of paroxysm, hand waving and "I told you so!" exclamations, similar to the recent flap over high-frequency trading.

  • Yes, volatility and a lack of a defined trend is still killing traders, and yes we are still very dependent for daily trading trends on headlines from Europe. But doesn't it feel like dollars are flowing out of rest of world and into the U.S.?

  • A surprising number of traders think some curveball will be thrown, but German media seem to believe that the deal is already done and the bailout is constitutional.

  • Amidst record-high levels of bearishness on Wall Street over the political crisis in Europe and the U.S., a funny thing is happening today.

  • European stocks hit another downdraft in the past two days on the realization that the northern European electorate is balking at even the current level of bailouts, let alone discussion of a closer fiscal union.

  • I read an interview in the German newsmagazine Spiegel with economic historian Hans-Joachim Voth. Voth has examined the history of 28 European countries over the last 90 years. His conclusion: "Austerity and anarchy are closely linked."

  • Europe closing down but off the lows. Many traders felt that the lows of the day might be reached in the morning as we go into the European close. The dollar has weakened, the euro strengthened...

  • Bob Pisani

    A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani covers Wall Street from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

Wall Street