Trader Talk with Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani
CNBC "On-Air Stocks" Editor

A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani has covered Wall Street and the stock market for nearly 20 years. Pisani covered the real estate market for CNBC from 1990-1995, then moved on to cover corporate management issues before becoming Stocks Correspondent in 1997.

In addition to covering the global stock market, he also covers initial public offerings (IPOs), exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and financial market structure for CNBC.

In 2013, he won Third Place in the National Headliner Awards in the Business and Consumer Reporting category for his documentary on the diamond business, "The Diamond Rush."

In 2014, Pisani was honored with a Recognition Award from the Market Technicians Association for "steadfast efforts to integrate technical analysis into financial decision making, journalism and reporting."

Prior to joining CNBC, Pisani co-authored "Investing in Land: How to Be a Successful Developer." He and his father taught a course in real estate development at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania from 1987-1992. Pisani learned the real estate business from his father, Ralph Pisani, a retired real estate developer.

Follow Bob Pisani on Twitter @BobPisani.

More

  • The Italian bond auction: they got it done, but yields are still too high and demand was tepid

  • The euro fell out of bed as it dropped below $1.30 to an 11-month low, setting off a cascade of sell stops. No real headline news. Bear in mind, this is VERY THIN trading — that is likely the most important fact. A couple observations...

  • The issue is how much demand there is for longer-term paper, which will be auctioned tomorrow, including 3-year and 10-year paper. Italian 10-year yields are down to 6.85 percent about 15 basis points below yesterday (Tuesday).

  • Don't think that everything is the same, that stocks only move in tandem up or down. True, correlations are unusually high, but even in a space like retail there are plenty of winners and losers.

  • At some point, no one is a long-term holder. The long-term buy and hold investors are not as willing to buy and hold as they used to be.

  • italy_flag_200.jpg

    Traders will be watching Italy as it auctions a series of three-, seven-, nine-, and 10-year government bonds this week, totaling about 7.5 billion to 8.5 billion euros ($9.8 billion to $11 billion).

  • My favorite books of 2011. I know, everyone read Walter Isaacson's book on Steve Jobs. I didn't. Here's what made my Best Of list...

  • Though European stocks are up this week, and the European Central Bank's three-year loan program was deemed a success (it eased funding difficulties for banks), the euro is little changed, hovering around $1.30. Spreads on southern European bonds vs. German bunds are generally wider, and Italian 10-year bonds remain near 7 percent. This is a serious problem, as Italy has a series of bond auctions before the year is out.

  • Where's Mario? ECB head Mario Draghi did not show up for a planned news conference in Frankfurt. Meantime, Draghi's successful 3-year lending facility has not just eased funding difficulties for European banks—it's ignited a 3-day rally in European and U.S. banks.

  • Mario Draghi

    Mario Draghi holds a presser with the Brits. I mentioned yesterday that much of the 489 billion euros ($640 billion) that banks borrowed from the European Central Bank will go to paying off prior, shorter-term loans from the central bank. What's next from Mr. Draghi and the ECB?

  • Bob Pisani

    A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani covers Wall Street from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

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