Trader Talk with Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani
CNBC "On-Air Stocks" Editor

A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani has covered Wall Street and the stock market for nearly 20 years. Pisani covered the real estate market for CNBC from 1990-1995, then moved on to cover corporate management issues before becoming Stocks Correspondent in 1997.

In addition to covering the global stock market, he also covers initial public offerings (IPOs), exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and financial market structure for CNBC.

In 2013, he won Third Place in the National Headliner Awards in the Business and Consumer Reporting category for his documentary on the diamond business, "The Diamond Rush."

In 2014, Pisani was honored with a Recognition Award from the Market Technicians Association for "steadfast efforts to integrate technical analysis into financial decision making, journalism and reporting."

Prior to joining CNBC, Pisani co-authored "Investing in Land: How to Be a Successful Developer." He and his father taught a course in real estate development at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania from 1987-1992. Pisani learned the real estate business from his father, Ralph Pisani, a retired real estate developer.

Follow Bob Pisani on Twitter @BobPisani.

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  • A surprising number of traders think some curveball will be thrown, but German media seem to believe that the deal is already done and the bailout is constitutional.

  • Amidst record-high levels of bearishness on Wall Street over the political crisis in Europe and the U.S., a funny thing is happening today.

  • European stocks hit another downdraft in the past two days on the realization that the northern European electorate is balking at even the current level of bailouts, let alone discussion of a closer fiscal union.

  • I read an interview in the German newsmagazine Spiegel with economic historian Hans-Joachim Voth. Voth has examined the history of 28 European countries over the last 90 years. His conclusion: "Austerity and anarchy are closely linked."

  • Europe closing down but off the lows. Many traders felt that the lows of the day might be reached in the morning as we go into the European close. The dollar has weakened, the euro strengthened...

  • Stock futures, already, down 9 points, dropped an additional 10 points as nonfarm payrolls came in at zero job gains, below expecations of a gain of 70,000. This will increase the confidence of the crowd that argues we are heading into another recession—specifically that third-quarter gross domestic product will go negative.

  • After a short rally on the good news of a stronger ISM, stocks have drifted lower all day — many citing the decreased odds of QE3 (quantitative easing). Again, this kind of speculation creates distortions in markets; that's one of the key problems with QE3.

  • Gold Bars

    Straight from the mines, rough gold goes through a highly complex process, and often travels around the world before it ever makes it to the consumer.

  • The S&P rose 10 points as the August ISM showed surprising strength: 50.6, above consensus of about 48. A figure above 50 shows expansion, but the commmentary remains mixed.

  • The U.S. August ISM figure is out at 10 a.m. Consensus is about 48, anything below 50 indicates contraction. Watch what happens if the figure is weaker than consensus—say, 44 or below. If the market rises, that's a sign of gaming the Fed—traders expecting another round of quantitative easing.

  • Bob Pisani

    A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani covers Wall Street from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

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