Trader Talk with Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani
CNBC "On-Air Stocks" Editor

A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani has covered Wall Street and the stock market for nearly 20 years. Pisani covered the real estate market for CNBC from 1990-1995, then moved on to cover corporate management issues before becoming Stocks Correspondent in 1997.

In addition to covering the global stock market, he also covers initial public offerings (IPOs), exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and financial market structure for CNBC.

In 2013, he won Third Place in the National Headliner Awards in the Business and Consumer Reporting category for his documentary on the diamond business, "The Diamond Rush."

In 2014, Pisani was honored with a Recognition Award from the Market Technicians Association for "steadfast efforts to integrate technical analysis into financial decision making, journalism and reporting."

Prior to joining CNBC, Pisani co-authored "Investing in Land: How to Be a Successful Developer." He and his father taught a course in real estate development at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania from 1987-1992. Pisani learned the real estate business from his father, Ralph Pisani, a retired real estate developer.

Follow Bob Pisani on Twitter @BobPisani.


  • This is the first significant selloff we have seen in a couple weeks. But unlike the big down days we saw in August and September, this decline was on relatively light volume.

  • Europe closed just off its lows, with big banks down in the mid-single digits. This is the week of lowering expectations going into the EU Summit on October 23. Traders are expecting clarity on three issues.

  • AMR halted, down 10.8 percent, as it again triggered a single stock circuit breaker (halted for 5 minutes at 10:54am ET) on no news.

  • Deutsche Bank CEO Josef Ackerman, speaking in an interview on our air, said he was "confident we are getting closer to a comprehensive package" to address the European debt crisis. Let's hope so.

  • Here's a headline bound to stir debate: "EU said to see EFSF first-loss bond insurance is top option."

  • A Group of 20 nations ministerial meeting in Paris gets underway with much talk of an expanded role for the International Monetary Fund. A Financial Times story late Thursday said several emerging market countries, including China and Brazil, wanted to contribute to the IMF to buy special bonds or invest directly in sovereign debt.

  • With the vote from Slovakia, the EFSF expansion is now real. That's the good news. Now, the bad news...

  • One bright spot: credit cards. JPMorgan Chase is the largest issuer of Visa cards, with 24 percent of Visa's market. In fact, they are the largest credit card issuer in the U.S., period.

  • China is not exporting as much as they used to: Imports and exports were both lower than expected in September, as the trade surplus was much smaller than August and July. This seems pretty clearly linked to the slower global economy — exports to the European Union, for example, were half that from the prior month.

  • JPMorgan and Alcoa: what do they have in common? 1) They're the first large companies to report Q3 earnings, and 2) both had very low expectations going into their earnings.

  • Bob Pisani

    A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani covers Wall Street from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

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