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Trader Talk with Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani
CNBC "On-Air Stocks" Editor

A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani has covered Wall Street and the stock market for nearly 20 years. Pisani covered the real estate market for CNBC from 1990-1995, then moved on to cover corporate management issues before becoming Stocks Correspondent in 1997.

In addition to covering the global stock market, he also covers initial public offerings (IPOs), exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and financial market structure for CNBC.

In 2017, Pisani was honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Security Traders Association of New York for "dedication to the Association and the Industry."

In 2013, he won Third Place in the National Headliner Awards in the Business and Consumer Reporting category for his documentary on the diamond business, "The Diamond Rush."

In 2014, Pisani was honored with a Recognition Award from the Market Technicians Association for "steadfast efforts to integrate technical analysis into financial decision making, journalism and reporting."

Prior to joining CNBC, Pisani co-authored "Investing in Land: How to Be a Successful Developer." He and his father taught a course in real estate development at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania from 1987-1992. Pisani learned the real estate business from his father, Ralph Pisani, a retired real estate developer.

Follow Bob Pisani on Twitter @BobPisani.

More

  • Financial Crisis

    The regional manufacturing indexes — including this morning’s Chicago and Dallas figures — have almost without exception been below expectations. If the April ISM, out tomorrow, and the April jobs report, due out Friday, are also below expectations, we will see gross domestic product growth revised downward by many firms.

  • European Central Bank

    Ireland redux: Now there is word the Spanish government wants to create a "bad bank" (or series of "bad banks") to restructure the banking system. Weekend reports suggest the Spanish government is examining the creation of a "bad bank" similar to Ireland’s plan as part of an effort to restructuring the banking system.

  • Two things might affect that old saw.

  • economy_up_1.jpg

    First look at U.S. first quarter gross domestic product was disappointing, at 2.2 percent, well below consensus of 2.6 percent. Much of the debate on the U.S. economy could be summed up simply: Do you think growth will be north of 2.5 percent this year, or south of that? More ammunition for the bears.

  • Why am I on my high horse about not liking the markets today? Because a whole bunch of indicators are flashing warnings.

  • Why are we up today? You can thank the long reach of Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke. Love him or hate him, love QE3 (quantitative easing) or hate QE3, Mr. Bernanke has gotten good at this game.

  • wallstreet_sign_red_traffic_light_200.jpg

    A trio of problems for stocks today: lower euro; weak initial jobless claims (disappointingly high for the second week in a row); and choppier earnings reports.

  • The Fed raised its 2012 growth estimates, lowered its unemployment estimate, and slightly raised its inflation forecast. This was largely good news. But not in the topsy-turvy world of QE.

  • The Fed Exchange

    Discussing the key takeaways from Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke's speech on the economy, with CNBC's Steve Liesman, Rick Santelli, Bob Pisani and Gary Kaminsky.

  • The Federal Reserve headquarters in Washington, DC.

    Hope you were all listening to David Faber's excellent interview with Jeff Gundlach of DoubleLine Capital earlier today (Wednesday). Gundlach was lucent on the Fed’s “problem” with inflation.

  • Bob Pisani

    A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani covers Wall Street from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

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