Trader Talk with Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani

Bob Pisani
CNBC "On-Air Stocks" Editor

A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani has covered Wall Street and the stock market for nearly 20 years. Pisani covered the real estate market for CNBC from 1990-1995, then moved on to cover corporate management issues before becoming Stocks Correspondent in 1997.

In addition to covering the global stock market, he also covers initial public offerings (IPOs), exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and financial market structure for CNBC.

In 2013, he won Third Place in the National Headliner Awards in the Business and Consumer Reporting category for his documentary on the diamond business, "The Diamond Rush."

In 2014, Pisani was honored with a Recognition Award from the Market Technicians Association for "steadfast efforts to integrate technical analysis into financial decision making, journalism and reporting."

Prior to joining CNBC, Pisani co-authored "Investing in Land: How to Be a Successful Developer." He and his father taught a course in real estate development at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania from 1987-1992. Pisani learned the real estate business from his father, Ralph Pisani, a retired real estate developer.

Follow Bob Pisani on Twitter @BobPisani.

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  • Still no signs of inflows into U.S. mutual funds, according to TrimTabs. Charles Biderman phoned to say that U.S. equity funds continued to see outflows of $5 billion in October. Still, it's the smallest outflow since April.

  • The New Austerity: be careful what you wish for. Trading desks talking about a piece Pimco's Mohamed El-Erian wrote in the Washington Post this morning...Paul Ryan notwithstanding, it will be a tough time for austerity buffs. It's easy to argue against cap and trade. You can cast symbolic votes to get rid of healthcare reform, but trying to starve the beast by eliminating funding for different parts of it will be a grueling, exhausting slog.

  • Your Money Your Vote - A CNBC Special Report

    The biggest concern of traders: a post-election selloff as the market has long since priced in QE2 and a Republican victory in the House. The S&P has already rallied over 10 percent since the beginning of September.

  • October ISM manufacturing came in well above expectations. On that, the Dow Transports became the first major index since April to hit a (intraday) 52-week high. So why have we drifted lower?

  • Forex hurts Chevron—and others. I've noted two outlying events that are affecting earnings this season: commodity inflation, and foreign exchange.

  • The stock is moving off its lows—many energy traders are openly skeptical that the National Commission release of documents will make a big long-term difference.

  • Exxon reported a modest beat—important to look at the earnings stream, because the profits are big. Upstream earnings—that's exploration and production of oil and gas $5.47 billion—$1.46 billion more than same period last year—this is the first full quarter with XTO included.

  • Treasurys, which have been trading poorly for several weeks, are down again today...the possibility of a very modest QE2 program from the Fed (see the Hilsenrath piece in the WSJ this morning) is pushing the dollar up and pressuring commodity, industrial, and energy stocks.

  • Earnings: inflation rears its head, compressing margins at big users of raw materials. My prior reported noted strength in the luxury retailers—but let's look at the other side of the coin today—the middle market, particularly home improvement, continues to see terrible results. And one reason margin is under pressure is inflation.

  • Coach has confirmed that global luxury brands are in good shape. Coach reported astonishing numbers, well above expectations (gross margins of 74.2%!) with strength not just in Asia but also in the U.S.

  • Bob Pisani

    A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani covers Wall Street from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

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